features

The Top 11 Global Brands Most Americans Don't Know

When it comes to globally known super-brands, Americans could be forgiven for thinking the U.S. of A. has a lock on all the most valuable names. But some of the world's most valuable brands are not only owned by foreign companies, they are names many of us have probably never even heard of.

The 6 Biggest Busted Bets of 2012

As pundits and politicians rush to sew the year up into a neat little bundle, we decided to look at 2012 from a slightly different angle. Here is our list of the year's worst bets -- six developments that seemed like sure things in January, but were bust by December.

The Most Depressing Christmas Gift Guide of the Year

Since a ban on assault weapons won't be under the tree this Christmas, a few companies -- notably Utah-based Amendment II -- are betting that parents will take their children's safety into their own hands.

Amid Newtown Tragedy, Scam Artists Creep In

The family of Noah Pozner was mourning the 6-year-old, killed in the Newtown school massacre, when outrage compounded their sorrow. Someone they didn't know was soliciting donations in Noah's memory, claiming that they'd send any cards, packages and money collected to his parents and siblings.

Murder by Numbers: Digging Into the Data of America's Gun Culture

There's no lack of numbers to bring to bear in a discussion about guns in America, but here's the big one: 281,757 people in this country died of gunshot wounds from 2001 and 2011. DailyFinance's Bruce Watson digs into the unadorned data on the results of this country's obsession with guns.

Arizona Ticket Holder Claims Half of Record $587.5 Million Powerball Jackpot

The holder of a winning lottery ticket bought in Arizona has come forward to claim half of the record $587.5 million Powerball lottery jackpot, the Arizona lottery said on Friday. The unidentified ticket holder shares the huge prize in the November 29 draw with a Missouri couple who claimed their prize a week ago.

Missouri Powerball Winners Are Mechanic and Wife

A 52-year-old Missouri mechanic and his wife claimed their share Friday of the record $588 million Powerball jackpot. Mike and Cindy Hill are taking the lump sum option, which means that after taxes, they will receive about $136.5 million.

Winning Tickets Sought in $588 Million Powerball Jackpot

The search is on for the country's newest multimillionaires, the holders of two tickets that matched all six numbers to claim a record $588 million Powerball jackpot. The winning tickets were sold at a convenience store in suburban Phoenix and a gas station just off Interstate 29 in a small northwestern Missouri town.

2 Winning Powerball Tickets Will Share $588 Million Jackpot

Two lucky tickets -- one sold in Arizona and another in Missouri -- will split the largest Powerball jackpot ever. The numbers drawn Wednesday night for the $587.5 million prize were 5, 16, 22, 23, 29. The Powerball was 6. Winners have not yet come forward with either ticket.

Pop Quiz: What Were 2012's Strangest Ballot Propositions?

While the main event on Tuesday night was the presidential election, many voters also had the opportunity to amend their local or state laws -- and some of those propositions were more than a bit off-the-wall. Curious about the bold and bizarre ideas that made the ballot? Take our quiz.

The 11 Costliest Hurricanes in U.S. History

When Sandy struck New York City and other major East Coast population centers, it immediately vaulted onto the list of the most expensive storms in U.S. history. Repairing the damage will ultimately cost tens of billions of dollars. Here's how Sandy stacks up to other devastating Atlantic storms.

A Surprising Factor in Your Kids' Success: Whether You Own or Rent

There's a new study shows a surprising way parents can encourage their kids' success: Buy a house. The results suggest teenage children of homeowners are 2.6% less likely to drop out of school than teens whose parents rent their home, and are 5% less likely to get pregnant.

Would You Pay $11 to Save Every Endangered Species on Earth?

Opponents of the Endangered Species Act don't argue against it because they have something against gorillas -- it's because, they say, the cost in lost jobs and higher taxes seems too high. But a study recently published in the journal Science suggests it's much lower than you'd guess.

Postal Service Keeps Delivering Mail Through Hurricane Sandy

As Hurricane Sandy began tearing up the East Coast, thousands evacuated their homes, schools closed, and millions of businesses and government offices told their workers to stay home. But a few employers did not: the Supreme Court, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Home Depot, Lowe's, and the U.S. Postal Service.

13 Ways Americans Throw Away Money

Blame the government or blame the economy, but Americans should also blame themselves for their declining net worth. We waste over half a trillion dollars each year -- and that's just for areas with available data. And what do we waste that money on? Read on ...

Five Things to Look for During the Presidential Debate

Make no mistake about it: come Thursday morning, there will be a winner. If Romney wins, he will change the narrative of this election and give his flagging campaign some much-needed energy. If Obama wins, he has all but sealed up his re-election. If it is a draw, Obama wins because with so little time remaining Romney needed to do more than draw even.

American Spirits: Mike Rowe Pours a Shot of Alcoholic Economic History

In "How Booze Built America," Mike Rowe of "Dirty Jobs" mixes little-known history with economic analysis, puns and many tasty beverages to explain how the American story is really the tale of one nation's love affair with alcohol. Here are a few of Rowe's favorite high points.

Pop Quiz: Who Gets the Benefit from Federal Entitlement Programs?

Over the past few years, the benefits that America offers its citizens have become the center of a huge debate. But who actually qualifies for benefits, and how are they designed to work? If you're interested in where entitlement spending goes, take a peek at our little quiz.

America's 10 Most Hated Industries

Americans are not happy with the government. But for the first time in a long while, it is not the most hated industry in the country. That honor now belongs to the oil and gas industry as a result of climbing prices at the pumps and the BP oil spill still fresh in many people%u2019s minds.

Pop Quiz: Do You Know the Cool Facts About Cold, Hard Cash?

Forget flags and fireworks: When it comes to things that really hold America together, few things beat the little scraps of green and black paper that we keep in our pockets. They pay for our necessities and feed our dreams, but how much do you really know about them?

What Two Unlikely Art Collectors Can Teach You About Investing

Herb and Dorothy Vogel never earned much money, but together, they amassed them one of the most significant modern art collections in the country. Now, you can't replicate the Vogel's genius, but you could learn from them -- because the rules they followed apply just as well in the investment world as the art world.

10 Painless Ways to Dramatically Slash Your Wedding Costs

With the average wedding costing $27,000 (not including the honeymoon), savvy couples are hunting for savings wherever they can find them. These 10 tips won't make your day any less magical, but they will make a lot of the bill disappear.

Texas Pit Bull Rescue Scandal: Where Did All the Money Go?

For nearly 30 years, Leah Purcell ran the Spindletop Refuge for pit bulls in Willis, Texas. Last week, state workers found hundreds of dogs living in inhumane conditions there. The dogs have been removed, but the question remains: Spindletop took in an estimated $861,000 a year. Where did all that money go?