fannie mae

Should We Get Rid of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac?

What if Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-owned housing agencies that backstop so many of the nation's mortgages, ceased to exist? A new report from an influential bipartisan think tank says that's what should happen.

Her Financial Goal: Getting an Underwater Mortgage Afloat Again

Everyone has things they want to improve about their financial lives -- and we at DailyFinance are no exceptions. So we asked money expert Jean Chatzky for advice on how to reach our goals. Today: A photo editor looking to modify an underwater mortgage.

Young Real Estate Investor Seeks Best Use for Cash

Andy Buman has been financially responsible, and invested wisely in two rental properties and a home of his own in the Omaha, Neb., area. His small real estate empire is doing well, and he has saved an extra $20,000. His question for DailyFinance's Laura Rowley: Which loan should he apply it to for the best return?

Reverse Mortgage: Is It a Good Bet for You?

The reverse mortgage was invented to help seniors facing economic hardship access the equity in their homes. But these loan products are complicated, expensive and ripe for abuse, which lead a reader named Fred to ask DailyFinance's Laura Rowley for some advice. Here's what she told him:

Before Market Slide, Americans Were Losing Confidence

Even before the latest stock-market plunge, U.S. consumer confidence was already sliding downward, according to a Fannie Mae survey released Monday. Some 70% of respondents say the economy is heading in the wrong direction.

Fortune 500's Top 10 Losers: Down Billions, but Still Huge

Holding a spot on the Fortune 500 list puts a business in august company, but that isn't always synonymous with being successful. Each year, some companies manage to stay on the list despite experiencing profound problems, and losing billions of dollars for their stakeholders.

One Safe Way to Invest Now in Municipal Bonds

After respected banking analyst Meredith Whitney rattled the municipal bond market with her prediction of hundreds of billions of dollars in muni defaults, small investors dumped the bonds. That dire prediction may yet come true, but there are a few types of munis that still carry virtually no risk.

Foreclosure Mess Settlement Proposal Is No Fix at All

State attorneys general and federal regulators are rushing to settle the robo-signing foreclosure mess created by the banks and get the real estate market back on its feet. But their proposals don't fully address the one of the fundamental problems of the crisis: Who really owns all those homes?

Three Key Rules for Today's Housing Market

Some recent reports on the real estate market show home prices starting to stabilize in many areas. Other data suggests the housing market has further to fall. But whichever direction the national numbers are heading, there are few tenets that smart buyers and sellers should always follow.

Investor Lawsuits Are Raising the Heat on Bank of America for 'Putbacks'

When Countrywide Financial created deeply flawed mortgage-backed securities, it wasn't just selling bad financial products: It was breaking its contracts. Now some ordinary investors are suing Countrywide's buyer, Bank of America, to force it to repurchase those bad mortgages. That's their right, but there's nothing simple about this case, or its ramifications.

Another Way Banks Make Everyone Pay: The MERS Mess

The Mortgage Electronic Registration System was created by banks to save themselves a boatload in fees by keeping mortgage transfers off the books of local governments. Now, a New York judge says the whole system violates state law, and banks holding MERS mortgages there can't foreclose. So where will this chaotic mess go from here?

Obama's Mortgage Reforms: Higher Standards -- and Costs

The administration's proposed revamp of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is actually an offering of multiple policy options, essentially passing the political hot potato to the Republicans. Problem is, any fix is sure to make mortgages costlier, with potential harm to the housing market.

Why Rising Interest Rates Won't Break the Bull's Run

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note closed at a nine-month high Wednesday, and rising interest rates usually mean bad things for economic growth and stock prices. But until the benchmark hits 5%, explains market guru Jeffrey Kleintop, rising rates mean the good times for stock will continue.

Why the Supreme Court Should Review Hawaii's Foreclosures

Among the state systems governing foreclosure, Hawaii has a particularly fraud-riddled, draconian process. Suzanne Bonds was unbelievably exploited by the state's foreclosure process in 2004, but Hawaii's courts refused to help. Now, her attorneys have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to intervene.

Wall Street May Be a Casualty of Debt-Ceiling War

Debt and government spending are firmly at the top of the new Congress's agenda. Just the threat that the U.S. wouldn't pay its bills has traders worried and wondering if the U.S. could end up on the same chaotic economic path taken by Greece or Spain.

Investors Extend Talks With Bank of America Over Mortgage Bonds

Bank of America (BAC) said talks will continue with bondholders who are demanding it buy back securities backed by billions of dollars of bad mortgages. Bank of America has been in talks with investors including Pacific Investment Management Co (Pimco), BlackRock Inc (BLK) and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York over $47 billion of mortgage bonds, Bloomberg News reported.

Banks Resist Requests to Buy Back Failed Mortgage Loans

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are encountering growing opposition from banks as they try to make lenders including JPMorgan Chase & Co (JPM) and Bank of America Corp. (BAC) buy back failed mortgage loans. The two government-owned companies are trying to enforce contracts that require banks to take back loans that don%u2019t meet certain underwriting standards, Bloomberg News reported.

Was Washington Right to Bail Out GM and Wall Street?

Historians will look back on Washington's bailout of GM and Wall Street as the right move. That's because it's now clear that the costs of doing nothing would have been far higher, and it turns out that taxpayers may suffer only limited losses on this economic Hail Mary pass.