Did Online Travel Agencies Commit Tax Shenanigans?

Officials for some large U.S. cities are claiming that online travel agencies such as Expedia and Priceline are collecting hotel occupancy taxes from consumers, but not forwarding the full amount to governments. If the OTAs are forced to pass that tax money on, what will it do to their profits?

Priceline's New Alerts Help Bargain Hunters Find Deals

Priceline is adding new features to allow its customers to be alerted when certain pre-set criteria are reached, yet another move by an online travel agency to personalize itself for its customers. Read what Trefis sees as the future for Priceline -- and for its stock.

Why Google's Flight Search Will Hurt Expedia

The travel-related search market became more competitive recently when Google added flight schedules to its search results. This could have a significant impact on online travel agencies, but a look at the details of how the service works shows why it will hit Expedia much harder than rival Priceline.

Expedia's AirAsia Partnership Is Just the Ticket

Expedia, the world's largest online travel agency, soon will be selling flights, hotel bookings and holiday packages in the world's fastest growing aviation and tourism market, thanks to an exclusive deal with AirAsia. Trefis takes a look at what the deal will mean for both companies.

Expedia's Game Plan for India's Travel Market

Online travel portal Expedia began doing business in India almost two years ago, and is now scaling up operations there. By forming partnerships with local suppliers, Expedia hopes to jump to fourth place in the market in less than a year. Here's how it plans to go about it.

A Promising Stock Pick for Audacious Investors

Long disdained as overpriced, TravelZoo might be a promising investment for the brave at heart. Based on most indicators, the stock seems to have a bright future, and its Groupon-style business model suggests considerable growth potential.

The Best Corporate April Fools Day Pranks Ever

April Fools Day is the perfect time for people to play practical jokes and pranks on each other. But the holiday isn't just for individuals: Large companies have long had a tradition of using April 1 to pull humorous hoaxes on the public too. Here are some of my favorites from past years.

Airlines and Online Ticket Sites: Altered Flight Patterns

New technology is leading to changes in business relationships between airlines and online ticketing sites. It'll take a while for the new landscape to settle down, but the near-term result could be potential windfalls for some carriers -- and confusion for air travelers.

At Last, New Protections for Air Travelers Will Land in 2011

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is raising the bar for the treatment of airline passengers this spring. Don't expect more legroom in coach -- he's not a miracle worker -- but you will see more transparency in ticket pricing, better deals for bumped passengers, and reimbursement of luggage fees when checked bags are lost or delayed, among other changes.

Priceline's Long Trip from Dot-Com Bust to First Class

In 1999, Priceline saw its stock surge to absurd heights before it had earned a cent in profit, and after the bubble burst, it lost more than 99% of its value. But from that low, the discount travel site began a hard journey to profitability that has proven there are second acts in dot-com companies' lives.

Oracle's Larry Ellison Takes the CEO Cake

Larry Ellison (pictured) of Oracle (ORCL) tops the Wall Street Journal's new list of the twenty-five highest-paid CEOs of the last decade. Ellison's total compensation over the last ten years, including salary, bonus, stock and stock option grants, was $1.84 billion.

Web Shoppers Are Happier These Days

If you're feeling better lately when you look at your Netflix queue, e-ticket or online stock portfolio, you're not alone. A new study says consumer satisfaction with online retailers is up, especially with online brokerages and travel-booking sites.