exchange rate

America's Next Great Carmaker: Toyota?

Perhaps the most surprising recent news in the auto industry last week was this little gem. In large part owing to President Obama's negotiation of a free trade agreement with South Korea earlier this year, Toyota will be expanding exports of U.S.-built vehicles to Korea for sale.

How the Debt Ceiling Issue Will Hit Us in the Wallet

Even the phrase "debt ceiling" sounds like something too far removed from daily life to be of much interest. But ignoring the political battle over this issue would be a mistake: How the government handles the nation's debt limit will directly affect our personal finances in all sorts of important ways.

Dow Dives 178 Points on Fears China May Hike Rates

The Dow tumbled Tuesday 178 points, or 1.6%, to close at 11,024 as part of a global sell-off in stocks fueled by further speculation that China will hike interest rates to fight inflation and renewed worries over the wobbly finances of Ireland, Portugal and Greece.

U.S. Manufacturing Output Rises 0.5%, the Most Since July

The nation%u2019s manufacturing recovery accelerated in October as factory output jumped 0.5%, the Federal Reserve said. Overall industrial output was flat in the month, but the typical autumn plunge in utilities output skewed the top-line stat lower.

It's Time for a New Reserve Currency: Meet the Mondo

For a host of reasons, other countries would love to free their economies from the stranglehold of the U.S. dollar's influence, especially now, when the Fed's stimulus actions are pushing the dollar lower, and everything else higher. Global finance expert Peter Cohan has a simple answer: The Mondo.

Why Asian Nations Hate QE2, and What They Should Do

As the G-20 meets in South Korea, many world leaders have stepped up their complaints about the Fed's $600 billion quantitative easing program, as well as the rapid flow of capital into emerging markets. Some countries are installing capital controls in response, but those won't be enough, says global finance expert Peter Cohan.

Asian Markets Are Mixed as Investors Eye U.S. Elections

In Asia on Tuesday, Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index rose 0.1%, China's Shanghai Composite inched down 0.3%. and in Japan, the Nikkei 225 crept up 0.1%. Investors are closely monitoring the U.S. midterm elections, with many predicting that if the Democrats lose their majorities in both the House and the Senate, the dollar will continue to slide.

Can G-20 Prevent a Currency War?

The G-20 has a second chance to diffuse world currency tensions Friday and Saturday, when finance ministers and central bank governors meet in South Korea.

August Trade Gap Grows Due to Oil, Chinese Imports

The U.S. trade deficit unexpectedly jumped to $46.3 billion in August, as the nation%u2019s deficit with China surged to a record $28 billion -- pushing overall imports up 2.1%, while overall exports rose just 0.2%. Oil prices were the other key culprit as our petroleum deficit surged 5.7%.

World Spins Closer to a Currency War

The threat of a global currency war is heating up after global leaders failed to resolve their differences at International Monetary Fund talks, which ended Saturday.

Safe Haven No More: Swiss Franc Headed for Trouble

The Swiss franc has been the second-best performing major currency over the past six months, outpacing the dollar by 8.9% and the euro by 7.8%, thanks to shaky conditions elsewhere in Europe. But a broad range of signs suggest the Swiss currency is due for at least a short-term correction.

China's Currency Climbs, but Won't Help U.S. Jobless

Since June 19, when China's government finally began to allow its currency to slowly appreciate against the dollar, it's become clearer than ever that hopes that the new policy would redress the U.S.-China trade imbalance are wishful thinking at best.

China Won't Let Yuan Float So Freely After All

Last month, China said it would loosen the tight link between its currency, the yuan, and the U.S. dollar. It was a move welcomed by economists and world leaders who felt China was engaging in unfair currency manipulation. But on Wednesday, the government in Beijing backpedaled a bit.

Weak Euro Luring More Americans Overseas

The EU debt crisis is making the dollar stronger compared to the euro, and that means travel bargains for American tourists in Europe this summer. There's only one catch: Trans-Atlantic airfares are still high.

Cheaper Yuan Won't Bring U.S. Jobs Back

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's talks with Chinese leaders waltzed delicately around the subject of the low valuation of the Chinese yuan in Beijing

Using your Euros at U.S. stores

As the value of the dollar has plummeted worldwide, businesses in the United States might have an incentive to accept foreign currency for their...