employers

July Jobs Report: 4 Pieces Of Good News Buried In The Gloom

As the Labor Department reported, employers added 163,000 jobs last month -- far more than the 100,000 forecast and the biggest gain since February. But the nation's unemployment rate ticked up to 8.3 percent. Here are four pieces of good news buried in the report.

Social Recruiting: The Next Big Thing for Job Seekers

When it comes to finding your next employer, online job boards are out and social recruiting is in, says Robert McGovern, CEO of JobFox.com, a free website that enables job seekers to tap into private hiring networks. We chat with McGovern about the new era of online job hunting.

The Sorry State of America's Wage Earners

Everyone knows that the typical American household has been running in place or falling behind financially, thanks to stagnant wages and rising prices. But a new study from the the Economic Policy Institute shows that the problem has been endemic not for years, but for decades.

How Much Does Your Name Affect Where You Work?

Names define us, but do they determine our life choices? The idea that our names can influence those decisions is what psychologists call "implicit egotism." To test the concept, a recent study looked at how our names might affect where we choose to work. And what did the researchers find...?

Fewer Americans Get Employer Health Insurance

Amid high unemployment rates and rising health-care costs, a smaller proportion of Americans -- less than 45% -- are getting health insurance from their employers, according to a recent Gallup survey.

Employers Win Workers
With Perks, Not Raises

To retain top employees and attract new ones, U.S. companies are increasingly turning to perks such as subsidized training and flexible work conditions rather than raises. These incentives are finding a welcome among employees, too, especially educational benefits.

Career Risk-Taking Hits a New Low, Thanks to the Still-Weak Economy

Whether it was a fresh startup or a fresh start, fewer Americans seemed willing to take career risks last year, according to a new report by Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The percentage of job-seekers starting their own businesses or relocating for new positions fell to historic lows in 2010.

People@Work: Winter's Blasts Affect Not Only Hiring but Output, Too

It's hard to fathom that something as mundane as weather could affect employment statistics. But it clearly does. And it also has big impact on how much work actually gets done. And beyond the snows of winter, there's distractions like the Super Bowl that keep worker from their duties.

People@Work: Construction Job Growth Is Slowly Rebuilding

New forecasts show that the worst may be over for the construction industry, which was hit harder by the Great Recession than any other sector, as construction projects slowly resume. Some 27% of construction firms say they plan to add staff this year, while only 20% plan to cut jobs.

Tech Sector Job Cuts Fell to Lowest Level Since 2000

Job cuts in technology fields came to just under 47,000 last year, the lowest total for the sector since 2000, according to employment-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Better still, during the next 10 years, the sector is forecast to experience one of the fastest paces of job creation of any industry.

People@Work: These Days, Even Promotions Are Harder to Come By

Fresh data show that the number of promotions given to American workers has dwindled, suggesting that even those with jobs are having a tough time getting ahead. Fewer promotions are "a sign of the lingering impacts of the recession," one expert says.

Job-Seekers Are Getting a Bit More Upbeat

A new survey by job-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas found the number of unemployed seeking work similar to what it found in 2009. Now, though, there's more optimism that a job will be found. Challenger agrees, but it notes the path is still long and difficult.

People@Work: Boomers Are Turning 65 -- but Staying on the Job

The dawning of 2011 marks a milestone: The first of the nation's 76 million baby boomers turn 65, the traditional retirement age. New polls, however, show that for a range of reasons few boomers of this age are ready to retire. In fact, some don't ever expect to stop working.

'Jobs for Life' Make a Comeback in Germany

With U.S. unemployment at 9.8%, its easy to envy workers in countries where many companies guarantee jobs for life. And while the number of Japanese workers with such guarantees is shrinking, in Germany, it's rising rapidly. Could U.S. companies take a page out of the jobs-for-life handbook?

Economists: Jobs Are Coming.
The Unemployed: When?

An increasing number of observers, citing a preponderance of positive data, are optimistic that the stagnant labor market is finally beginning to gain momentum. But the pace is still way too slow for those desperately seeking work.

U.S. Employment Prospects Improve, Survey Says

The outlook for the U.S. job market has improved, with more employers planning to take on new staff in the first quarter of 2011 and fewer planning cuts, according to a survey by staffing agency Manpower. U.S. hiring plans are improved from three months ago and one year ago, Manpower said in a statement. Still, most employers said they did not plan to take on additional staff.

Holiday Hiring Takes a Hit, Despite a Brighter Economy

Retailers and shipping companies are adding fewer new jobs than they did a year ago. One reason for the low number is that employers began shopping for seasonal workers earlier than usual, boosting hiring in October. If retail sales hold up, December could see more hiring.

Millions of Unemployed Face a Loss of Benefits

Unemployed Americans are keenly awaiting congressional action on the latest extension of jobless benefits. With a midnight Tuesday deadline looming, some 2 million jobless workers face losing their only source of income in coming weeks.

Negative Attitudes Straining Worker Productivity

About 60% of those polled in a recent survey said negativity is making it more difficult for employees to stay focused. Criticism, gossip and lack of teamwork are all contributing to reduced productivity, the poll found.

Fewer CEOs Headed for the Exit in October

The number of chief executive officers leaving their posts in October fell to its lowest level in 18 months, according to a new report released today. The drop seems to show that the volatile job market, at least among corporate chiefs, appears to be stabilizing.

The Politics of Long-Term Unemployment

Come the end of November, some 2 million jobless workers won't be able to rely on their unemployment check unless Congress again extends the aid. But with the GOP regaining the House, the odds of that extension just got a lot longer.