employees

The Sorry State of America's Wage Earners

Everyone knows that the typical American household has been running in place or falling behind financially, thanks to stagnant wages and rising prices. But a new study from the the Economic Policy Institute shows that the problem has been endemic not for years, but for decades.

How Much Does Your Name Affect Where You Work?

Names define us, but do they determine our life choices? The idea that our names can influence those decisions is what psychologists call "implicit egotism." To test the concept, a recent study looked at how our names might affect where we choose to work. And what did the researchers find...?

Fewer Americans Get Employer Health Insurance

Amid high unemployment rates and rising health-care costs, a smaller proportion of Americans -- less than 45% -- are getting health insurance from their employers, according to a recent Gallup survey.

Employers Win Workers
With Perks, Not Raises

To retain top employees and attract new ones, U.S. companies are increasingly turning to perks such as subsidized training and flexible work conditions rather than raises. These incentives are finding a welcome among employees, too, especially educational benefits.

Career Risk-Taking Hits a New Low, Thanks to the Still-Weak Economy

Whether it was a fresh startup or a fresh start, fewer Americans seemed willing to take career risks last year, according to a new report by Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The percentage of job-seekers starting their own businesses or relocating for new positions fell to historic lows in 2010.

GM and Chrysler Will Pay Bonuses to Salaried Workers

Less than two years after they exited bankruptcy, Chrysler Group and General Motors will soon distribute bonuses to salaried employees in recognition of their efforts to help revive the once-flagging Detroit automakers. The payout is likely to anger the companies' unionized workers.

People@Work: Winter's Blasts Affect Not Only Hiring but Output, Too

It's hard to fathom that something as mundane as weather could affect employment statistics. But it clearly does. And it also has big impact on how much work actually gets done. And beyond the snows of winter, there's distractions like the Super Bowl that keep worker from their duties.

People@Work: Construction Job Growth Is Slowly Rebuilding

New forecasts show that the worst may be over for the construction industry, which was hit harder by the Great Recession than any other sector, as construction projects slowly resume. Some 27% of construction firms say they plan to add staff this year, while only 20% plan to cut jobs.

Tech Sector Job Cuts Fell to Lowest Level Since 2000

Job cuts in technology fields came to just under 47,000 last year, the lowest total for the sector since 2000, according to employment-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Better still, during the next 10 years, the sector is forecast to experience one of the fastest paces of job creation of any industry.

People@Work: These Days, Even Promotions Are Harder to Come By

Fresh data show that the number of promotions given to American workers has dwindled, suggesting that even those with jobs are having a tough time getting ahead. Fewer promotions are "a sign of the lingering impacts of the recession," one expert says.

Job-Seekers Are Getting a Bit More Upbeat

A new survey by job-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas found the number of unemployed seeking work similar to what it found in 2009. Now, though, there's more optimism that a job will be found. Challenger agrees, but it notes the path is still long and difficult.

People@Work: Boomers Are Turning 65 -- but Staying on the Job

The dawning of 2011 marks a milestone: The first of the nation's 76 million baby boomers turn 65, the traditional retirement age. New polls, however, show that for a range of reasons few boomers of this age are ready to retire. In fact, some don't ever expect to stop working.