employee

Why Workers Are More Stressed Out Than Ever

After years of recession and a less than stellar economic recovery, growing numbers of worker are feeling the emotional toll. More of them than ever feel undervalued, stressed out, and dissatisfied with their jobs, a new survey finds.

Fewer Americans Get Employer Health Insurance

Amid high unemployment rates and rising health-care costs, a smaller proportion of Americans -- less than 45% -- are getting health insurance from their employers, according to a recent Gallup survey.

Employers Win Workers
With Perks, Not Raises

To retain top employees and attract new ones, U.S. companies are increasingly turning to perks such as subsidized training and flexible work conditions rather than raises. These incentives are finding a welcome among employees, too, especially educational benefits.

People@Work: Construction Job Growth Is Slowly Rebuilding

New forecasts show that the worst may be over for the construction industry, which was hit harder by the Great Recession than any other sector, as construction projects slowly resume. Some 27% of construction firms say they plan to add staff this year, while only 20% plan to cut jobs.

Tech Sector Job Cuts Fell to Lowest Level Since 2000

Job cuts in technology fields came to just under 47,000 last year, the lowest total for the sector since 2000, according to employment-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Better still, during the next 10 years, the sector is forecast to experience one of the fastest paces of job creation of any industry.

People@Work: These Days, Even Promotions Are Harder to Come By

Fresh data show that the number of promotions given to American workers has dwindled, suggesting that even those with jobs are having a tough time getting ahead. Fewer promotions are "a sign of the lingering impacts of the recession," one expert says.

Job-Seekers Are Getting a Bit More Upbeat

A new survey by job-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas found the number of unemployed seeking work similar to what it found in 2009. Now, though, there's more optimism that a job will be found. Challenger agrees, but it notes the path is still long and difficult.

People@Work: Boomers Are Turning 65 -- but Staying on the Job

The dawning of 2011 marks a milestone: The first of the nation's 76 million baby boomers turn 65, the traditional retirement age. New polls, however, show that for a range of reasons few boomers of this age are ready to retire. In fact, some don't ever expect to stop working.

Economists: Jobs Are Coming.
The Unemployed: When?

An increasing number of observers, citing a preponderance of positive data, are optimistic that the stagnant labor market is finally beginning to gain momentum. But the pace is still way too slow for those desperately seeking work.

Holiday Hiring Takes a Hit, Despite a Brighter Economy

Retailers and shipping companies are adding fewer new jobs than they did a year ago. One reason for the low number is that employers began shopping for seasonal workers earlier than usual, boosting hiring in October. If retail sales hold up, December could see more hiring.

Millions of Unemployed Face a Loss of Benefits

Unemployed Americans are keenly awaiting congressional action on the latest extension of jobless benefits. With a midnight Tuesday deadline looming, some 2 million jobless workers face losing their only source of income in coming weeks.

Fewer CEOs Headed for the Exit in October

The number of chief executive officers leaving their posts in October fell to its lowest level in 18 months, according to a new report released today. The drop seems to show that the volatile job market, at least among corporate chiefs, appears to be stabilizing.

GM Says Employees Can Buy IPO Shares

General Motors is offering some 600,000 employees, retirees and dealers the chance to purchase stock in the resurgent company as the auto giant moves forward with its initial public offering, slated for next month.

People@Work: Hard Times Haven't Made Workers Any Smarter

If the recession and subsequent high employment proves anything, it's this: The scarcity of jobs hasn't made workers any smarter. Just-fired CNN anchor Rick Sanchez is a good example. Unfortunately, he's hardly the only one.

The Growing Mismatch Between Jobs and Skills

In the U.S., 52% of companies report problems attracting critical-skill employees. Some of the hottest jobs over the next 10 to 15 years require tech skills that aren't gained at traditional manufacturing jobs. Here are some strategy's for getting those skills.

A Hopeful Outlook for Retailers' Holiday Hiring

Two consecutive months of sales gains among the nation's retailers may provide just enough confidence to trigger increased seasonal hiring this year, says research firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Even so, prerecession hiring levels aren't likely.

More Signs of an Improving Job Market

A fresh batch of data show that the job market may finally have turned the corner despite last month's uptick in the national unemployment rate to 9.6%. Among them: Fewer initial claims for unemployment and a smallest monthly layoff total since June 2000.

How Many Workers Can You Hire for the Price of One CEO?

CEOs at some large public companies earn more per day than their employees earn over the course of an entire year. We took a look at some of the country's most well-known companies and calculated just how many workers the CEO's annual paycheck could afford to hire.

Happiness Coaching: Is it a Positive or a Negative?

A growing list of companies have jumped on the "happiness coaching" bandwagon. To its practitioners, it is a proven method that can lead to changed lives. But to its detractors, its just another gimmick for squeeze more work out of dispirited employees.

Former Bank of America Employee Tells All in Video

Jackie Ramos, a former "customer advocate" from the collections department at Bank of America, posted a video on YouTube in which she offers an inside scoop on the practices of the bank. Ramos says that while her former employer encouraged her to "do the right thing for the customer," she soon came to realize that her job was actually to squeeze as much money as possible from the company's cardholders.