emergency fund

5 Ways to Prevent Panic From Plundering Your Portfolio

With the stock market near its all-time high, few investors are terribly worried about their portfolios right now. But that makes it the best time to take steps to panic-proof your portfolio in preparation for the next financial crisis.

10 States with the Most People Living on Edge of Financial Ruin

Across America today, millions of people are unable to save for even short-term emergencies -- but in some places, people have it worse than others. Business Insider reveals the states where residents are the least able to cope with unexpected money troubles.

Build Your Emergency Savings: 25 Ways to Make Extra Money

It's a personal finance rule of thumb: Have enough of an emergency savings cushion that you could get by without income for 3 months. But in this economy, who can save that much? You can -- and we've got 25 ways to help you find the extra cash to make it happen.

Should You Invest Your Emergency Fund?

Smart personal finance rules dictate having an emergency savings fund set aside where you can access it fast. But do you really have to keep enough money for three to six months of expenses in a savings account where it earns almost no interest?

My $5,000 Emergency: How I Managed It (and You Can, Too)

A $5,000 car repair bill is the kind of thing that can push even a frugal family's finances over the edge. But here's a simple emergency fund tip that will help you avoid a worst-case scenario when Murphy's Law catches up with your budget.

13 Financial New Year's Resolutions to Keep in 2013

When it comes to keeping New Year's resolutions, plenty of us don't have such great track records. But most people who made financial resolutions in 2012 kept them, which makes them a smart addition to your annual ritual. To set the stage for your success in 2013, here are 13 resolutions to consider.

The Surprising Generation that Has a Handle On Its Finances

We all know that we should save more and spend less, but we don't always follow that advice. When you break down our responses to the financial crisis by generation, however, some interesting patterns emerge -- and you probably wouldn't guess which generation is doing the worst at financial wellness.

Money Mic: How My Dad%u2019s Life Insurance Saved Our Family

According to a nationwide study, 57% of respondents own life insurance, but only 28% feel extremely confident in their understanding of life insurance. Today, Alden Wicker shares a very personal story from her childhood, which drove home to her just how important it is for parents to have life insurance.

Women and Money: How You Can Close the Financial Gender Gap

Women are falling behind men in the nitty-gritty of financial management, which is surprising, since they so often have the power of the purse. Here's what financial advisor Nicole Seghetti discovered women want in terms of their personal finances -- and what they need.

Twentysomethings: It's Time to Declare Financial Independence

As we prepare to celebrate our nation's independence, let's take a moment to think about our individual declarations of financial independence. If you're still ruled by debt, fiscal confusion, and reliance on others, here are a few tips for breaking free.

How This Family Beat the Recession -- and You Can Too

The recession was brutal to the typical American family: On average, household net worth fell by 39% between 2007 and 2010. But reporter Chuck Saletta's family bucked that trend with these four simple strategies.

How to Avoid Your Next Money Crisis: A 5-Step Prep Plan

Financial frenzies come in many flavors, most triggered by big life changes, fraught with emotion and unfamiliar challenges. But if you let those events lead you to make spur-of-the-moment money decisions, you'll often face even bigger problems down the road.

10 Smart Uses for Your Tax Refund

Tax refund checkBy Kimberly Lankford, Kiplinger


If you have a refund check coming your way, consider using it to bolster your personal balance sheet. The average...

Worried About a Money Disaster? Here's Your Plan B

Do you fear something awful is around the corner when it comes to your finances? Given recent years' economic woes, it's not unreasonable. But you can turn your worries to your advantage by planning for the worst before anything goes wrong.

6 Strategies for Young Adults to Save More in 2012

Saving doesn't come easily for us young adults. Entry-level salaries don't give you a lot to work with, and we tend to spend what we make. But don't worry: We're not doomed to frivolity and financial ruin. Here's how you can start saving smart.

Readers' Tips for Financial Revival, Part 1: Smart Saving

A few weeks ago, we asked DailyFinance readers for their best tips for putting your financial house in order. Many were quick to note that the foundation of financial security lies in being ready when disaster hits. Here are some of their best suggestions for planning for those rainy days.

4 'Must Do' Money Moves to Achieve Fiscal Fitness

There are many roads to financial security, but whatever path you follow, there are some mandatory steps everyone ought to take along the way. Alexa von Tobel, founder of LearnVest.com, cuts through the thicket of advice to give us her essential keys to sound money management.

7 Financial New Year's Resolutions to Keep

Every January, we plan to make changes, and we often don't succeed. Let's make this New Year's different: Here are seven fairly simple resolutions recommended by the financial experts for getting you on a firmer fiscal footing in 2012.

Help Your Kids Save While They're Still in School

So your resident college student is knee-deep in student loans, tuition, fees and rent payments. But infusing her bank account will sap the funds you have earmarked for your retirement. What's a concerned parent to do? Help her start building up some savings of her own. Here's how:

When Does It Make Sense to Pay Off a Mortgage?

Paul, 62, is like a lot of people near retirement: He wants a safe place to invest his money. But the interest rates on savings accounts barely keep up with inflation. Would it make sense to pay off a mortgage instead? DailyFinance's Laura Rowley reports.

Out of Work Man Asks: Should I Pay Off My Mortgage?

Nicholas, 60, is a paralegal who has been jobless for more than a year, and is worried about the possibility of losing his home in rural Pennsylvania. If he depletes his savings and cashes out of a life insurance policy, he can pay off his mortgage. But is that the smartest move?

What to Do First: Save or Pay Down Your Debts?

For many households, it's a personal fiance dilemma: Should they try to pay down debt first, or build up savings? In the aftermath of the Great Recession, opinions have clearly tipped toward the ditch-your-debt side. But that's not always the right answer.