egypt protests

Ian Bremmer Talks Global Politics and Investing Pitfalls

Most Wall Street experts are far better equipped to analyze corporate risks rather than political ones. But today, it's political unrest in the Middle East and beyond that's driving world markets. So we asked Ian Bremmer, president of political risk consultancy The Eurasia Group, to break down the major developments and what investors should expect.

Labor's Fall -- Not Oil's Rise -- Is Key to Inflation

Despite all the worry over the impact of rising oil prices, recall that the U.S. is now a largely services-based economy, and observe that the rising wages that have led to real overall cost rises in decades past are nowhere to be found today. Exhibit A is in Wisconsin.

Will Higher Airfares Ground More Flyers?

Cathay's Tony Tyler explains that when airlines last raised fares in 2008, most travelers kept right on flying. But as Mideast upheavals send oil prices skyward and airlines hike fares again to compensate, the impact on the industry's bottom line could be quite different.

Consumer Sentiment Index Jumps to Three-Year High

The markets may have had a rough weak as U.S. GDP growth was revised down and Middle East unrest caused oil prices to rise, but the consumer sentiment index rose to its highest level since January 2008. Sentiment has risen for about six months -- an encouraging sign -- but oil prices could sour the mood.

Calm Returns to Egypt, but Not American Tourists

Egypt's famed antiquities and tourism sites are reopening following the political unrest there. But heeding warnings from Washington, many American travelers are steering clear from the region for now -- disrupting the tourism industry in both the U.S. and Egypt.

The Mideast Mess Could Make U.S. Markets Look Better

Investors sure have plenty of worries these days. But here's a key point to keep in mind: While higher energy prices will restrain overall global growth, they could hurt emerging markets far worse than the U.S. -- and that difference could help boost demand for domestic stocks.

Libya Isn't the Only Force Working Against Stocks

With Mideast turmoil chasing oil higher and stocks lower, it's a good time to check the charts and see what price levels seem to be key "lines in the sand." Some indicators have been warning for months that the steep rally was preparing to reverse.

Libya Hits Stocks and Oil Prices for a Second Day

Stocks fell for a second straight day Wednesday and oil prices briefly crossed the $100-a-barrel mark after violence escalated in Libya and tech bellwether Hewlett-Packard delivered a disappointing outlook. The Dow lost 0.9%, the S&P 500 fell 0.6%, and the Nasdaq declined 1.2%.

Can Social Media Be Used to Incite Corporate Revolutions?

Social media played a key role in the successful revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, and more dictatorial regimes are facing protesters who use the Internet as a weapon. But could the power of social networking create similar revolutionary changes in the corporate world?

Chaos in Today's Egypt Sparks Worries About Its Ancient Past

The frightening battles in Egypt have Americans peppering museums with questions about what's going on there. At the same time, antiquities authorities in Egypt are warning museums and auction houses to be on the alert for people trying to sell looted items.

Buddhist Economics? Raj Patel Suggests a New Idea of Value

Worried about the meaning of existence? You might want to check out Raj Patel's best-selling book "The Value of Nothing." Its message about how we value -- and misvalue -- the world and ourselves charts a middle path toward a society in which our economic choices aren't dominated by Big Brother or big corporations.

Why the Dollar Is Tanking as Cairo Burns

When a world crisis erupts, such as the current fighting in Egypt, investors usually flee to safety. Historically, that has meant piling into the U.S. dollar. But a funny thing happened when protesters took to the streets of Cairo. For the reason why, look to Europe.

Can Al Jazeera Capitalize on Its Newfound Popularity?

The Qatar-based network is getting international kudos for its coverage of the growing Middle East crisis. But acclaim and a growing audience don't yet equal profits and market share for Al Jazeera, which has almost certainly been losing money since its launch in 1996.

Out of Egypt's Chaos, Opportunity for Investors?

With protesters swarming the streets of Egypt, its stock market has taken a hit. But discount the doomsday scenarios. The sell-off could provide a good entry point for investors with the stomach to endure until things turn around, which seems more likely than most now expect.

Google, Twitter to Let Egyptians Tweet by Voicemail

Google (GOOG) and Twitter have launched a phone service that will let people in Egypt send out tweets, even though the country%u2019s Internet service has been effectively shut down. Users will be able to call a phone number and leave a voice message, which will then be translated and tweeted with the #egypt tag, The Guardian reported.

Oil Prices: Egypt's Crisis Could Hurt Europe First

Even though no reports of supply disruptions have surface, Brent crude hit $100 a barrel in London trading, while U.S. prices hovered near $90. Europe is more vulnerable because much of its crude flows through the Suez Canal and adjacent pipelines.

Oil Prices Are Likely to Drop Before They Rally Again

With an oversupply of oil on the market and OPEC afraid that higher prices will impair the U.S. recovery and sap demand, the fundamentals point to an oil price drop in the near term. Yes, markets move on emotion, and fears about unrest in Egypt have reversed that downward price trend, but the drop is probably coming.