economic impact

Hurricane Sandy to Cost Businesses Billions

Economists say it will take a while to fully estimate the economic impact of the storm. But they believe the impact will be enough to lower the nation's gross domestic product, the broadest reading of the nation's economic activity, in the fourth quarter.

Days and Dollars Lost to the Flu Hit a Fever Pitch

Tallying up the flu's effect on our economy is enough to make you sick. Influenza was responsible for 100 million lost work days in 2010, according to a Walgreens study. That's $7 billion in lost wages, and $10 billion in lost productivity. Inspired to get vaccinated this year? We'll point you to the best deal.

Luxury Biz on Edge After Japan's Earthquake

The Japanese are the world's most voracious consumers of luxury goods, from Louis Vuitton handbags to Cartier jewelry to Hermes high fashion. So purveyors of those luxury goods are justifiably worried about the effect of the Japanese earthquake and tsunami on their bottom lines.

The Scariest Part of Soaring Oil Prices: Investors' Fears

Friday's market sell-off may have been more about paranoia than about real risk. Some JPMorgan calculations indicate that the potential impact of rising oil prices on the economy may be less than most investors think. But the fear factor itself also can't be overlooked.

Dallas-Area Companies Go Whole Hog for Super Bowl XLV

Super Bowl XLV will set records both for stadium attendance and for event fund-raising, and North Texas corporations haven't been shy to put out the welcome mat for their favored clients. How much will communities and local businesses score from the big game?

A Dose of Bah, Humbug for Holiday Sales Growth

Major retailers are reporting healthy gains in November revenues, adding more evidence that holiday sales will be significantly higher than last year. But reading that as a sign of a wider economic recovery may be giving too much credit to what turns out to be a tiny sliver of U.S. GDP.

The Economic Impact of NBA's LeBron James

In addition to the sporting issues involved in the fervent courting of LeBron James lies a less emotional, more pragmatic reason for why bigwigs like New York's Mayor Bloomberg care so much: cold, hard cash.