double dip

How to Survive the Stock Market's Wild Ride

The stock-market roller coaster of the last couple of weeks -- culminating with Thursday's 500-point plunge on the Dow -- has been enough to make even the most stoic investors sweat. Experts offer opinions on how you can turn uncertainty into opportunity.

Three Key Rules for Today's Housing Market

Some recent reports on the real estate market show home prices starting to stabilize in many areas. Other data suggests the housing market has further to fall. But whichever direction the national numbers are heading, there are few tenets that smart buyers and sellers should always follow.

Top Economists See Consumers Rebounding Faster

Forget the gloomy predictions: According to Richard Berner of Morgan Stanley, U.S. consumers are a year ahead of schedule in repairing their household balance sheets, giving them the ability to start spending again soon. And the head of the IMF was explicit Monday: A double dip is unlikely.

'Dr. Doom': 40% Chance of a Double-Dip

Like many economists, Roubini predicts that second-quarter gross domestic product growth will be revised down to an a annual rate of 1.2% from an initial reading of 2.4%. Additionally, a "series of tailwinds in the first half of the year ... are going to be essentially headwinds" in the second half. He now pegs the chances of a "double dip" recession at 40%.

Why Retailers May Be Lowballing Their Forecasts

Recent earnings reports from a range of retailers sounded almost bipolar: The first quarter was great, but the second half won't be. In this case, they may be more concerned about spinning Wall Street's expectations than they are about a double-dip recession.

Rising Mortgage Rates Bode Ill for Housing

Last week, the average for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages climbed to 5.21%, the highest it has been since August. What does that means for the housing market? Probably nothing good. And nothing could be worse than for home prices to start sliding again.

Double Dip in Home Prices Likely in 2010

Overall U.S. home values declined again in the fourth quarter of 2009. And while prices in some markets appear to have hit bottom, values are slipping again in many parts of the country, even in some areas that had seen several months of gains.