Could Your Credit Score End Your Marriage?

Couples with a greater disparity in their credit scores are more likely to break up, according to preliminary results of a study by Federal Reserve Board researchers.

'Do We Need a Prenup?' Why You Really Should Discuss It

To many couples, following a romantic marriage proposal with a pragmatic discussion about a prenuptial agreement feels like you're predicting a divorce. But the conversation can have real benefits for the health of your union and your finances.

Lies and Debt Situations: When Couples Keep Money Secrets

Financial counselors aren't marriage counselors, but when it comes to couples' spats over hidden debt and secret spending, they're often helping people deal with some heavy emotional baggage along with the hefty credit card bills.

10 Things You Must Know About Social Security

Many Americans will make Social Security the bedrock of their retirement plan, but there's more to the benefit than having a birthday and signing up to get your checks. Here are 10 essentials you need to know to get all the money you're entitled to out of the Social Security system.

No Man, More Money: Five Women Who Thrived After Divorce

Recent female divorcees are twice as likely to live at or below the poverty line as their male counterparts, a Spectrem Group study reports. But there are plenty of people who refuse to be bound by such stereotypes: These five women learned to whistle a far different -- and richer -- tune after their marriages ended.

Don't Let Divorce Destroy You at Tax Time

Divorce is one of the hardest things you may ever go through. But while you're focused on your now-adversarial relationship with your ex, you shouldn't forget to keep an eye on another entity that may be after a larger chunk of your assets thanks to your split: The IRS.

How to Get Your Ex to Help Fund Your Retirement

If you're divorced, your ex-husband or ex-wife might still be able to help you feather your nest in retirement. And there's at least one former-spouse benefit you won't need to go to court to get access to: payments based on their Social Security earnings record.

Readers' Tips for Financial Revival, Part 1: Smart Saving

A few weeks ago, we asked DailyFinance readers for their best tips for putting your financial house in order. Many were quick to note that the foundation of financial security lies in being ready when disaster hits. Here are some of their best suggestions for planning for those rainy days.

Don't Skimp on Your Divorce: Lesson from a N.Y. Bigamist

Of all the regrets commonly expressed by the recently divorced, "I'm sorry I didn't pay my lawyer more money" is probably last on the list. But for one New York woman, the decision to go cheap on the legal fees led to a nasty surprise as she found herself with two husbands.

The Long-Term Relationship You Just Can't Quit

For all the anti-bank anger erupting across the country, relatively few of us are actually parting ways with our significant financial institutions because of it. In the past six weeks a mini bank-run sent 700,000 new customers to credit unions. But that's hardly noticeable on the scale of all U.S. banking customers.

Got Hitched Too Fast? Say 'I Do' to a DIY Divorce

You wed on a whim, on a bender, or whatever it was that compelled you to commit to love, honor and cherish. Now you want it over. Sound familiar? It may not work for Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries, but if your union has gone from honeymoon directly to horror in a hurry, there's a fast easy way to end a marriage on the cheap.

Is It Smart to Tap Retirement Funds to Buy a Home?

A 53-year-old woman got divorced in May, and now, she wants to relocate to a new city and buy a little bungalow for herself and her 100-pound dog. But with her low income, she's wondering whether her best bet to get that home is deplete her retirement savings and buy it with cash. Our experts weigh in.