detroit auto show

Ford Details Its Lincoln Reboot, Chrysler Talks Trucks

At the North American International Auto Show in Detroit Tuesday, Ford and Chrysler both announced plans to introduce a host of new models. Ford will add seven vehicles with "truly unique Lincoln DNA" to its luxury line, while Chrysler has its eyes on new pickups, a revived Jeep Grand Wagoneer, and possibly, a 'mini-minivan.'

Ford and Toyota Debut New Electric and Hybrid Vehicles

New models from Ford and Toyota drew the hottest interest Monday as the North American International Auto Show opened in Detroit: Each announced several electric and hybrid vehicles, including an electric Focus and a plug-in Prius.

Fiat Boosts Stake in Chrysler to 25% After Hitting Milestone

Italian automaker Fiat increased its stake has in Chrysler Group to 25% after the U.S. automaker met a key goal by starting engine production at a plant in Dundee, Mich., the company said Monday during the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Ford to Add 1,800 Jobs in Kentucky for Escape SUV

Ford plans to invest $600 million in a Kentucky plant to build the next-generation Escape SUV, creating an 1,800 additional jobs, the automaker said Thursday. The new jobs will be added incrementally after the Louisville Assembly plant is rehabbed and reopened late next year.

Is 'Cash for Clunkers' Gearing Up Again?

At the auto show in Detroit, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood "Cash for Clunkers" as "the most wildly successful program ever." The remarks suggest the guzzler trade-in program may not have driven into the sunset. But with a majority of Americans opposing it, a retread may not be the best idea.

GM Considers Reopening Closed Plants

Strong demand for some General Motors models is causing the Detroit auto maker to consider reopening some plants it closed in recent months as GM downsized its business. Plants that build the Chevrolet Equinox, GMC Terrain and Cadillac SRX crossover vehicles and the Buick LaCrosse sedan are at capacity and can't meet demand, said Mark Reuss, GM's North America president, speaking to reporters at the Detroit auto show that got underway Monday.