debt limit

House Votes to Defuse Debt Limit Crisis

The House overwhelmingly passed a bill Wednesday to permit the government to borrow enough money to avoid a first-time default for at least four months, defusing a looming crisis setting up a springtime debate over taxes, spending and the deficit.

Markets Cautious Ahead of Debt Ceiling Vote

Stock markets traded cautiously on Wednesday ahead of a U.S. vote on raising the nation's borrowing limit temporarily. The House is set to vote on a motion to increase the nation's $16.4 trillion borrowing ceiling for three months.

Night of the Living Debt Ceiling: The Fiscal Horror That Is to Come

Last week's fiscal cliff deal did much to resolve the dark specter of economic uncertainty in America. However, it was only the first of three fiscal crises set to hit before March. Next on deck, another sequestration battle; and then the biggie: "Debt Ceiling 2: The Tea Party Strikes Back."

Debt Crisis Looms as Congress Digs in Its Heels

Legislators show no signs they're heading toward compromise in resolving the nation's next financial crisis, with Democrats talking about further taxes hikes on the rich, and Republicans saying a crippling default on U.S. debt is possible unless they get significant cuts in government spending.

Fiscal Cliff Averted: And Here Are the Next 6 Crises to Worry About

The fiscal cliff has been averted -- at least for now. But if we've managed to dodge one devastating, intentionally-created crisis, there are plenty more massive problems on deck. Here's a list of the next six ways Washington could mess things up for tens of millions of Americans.

U.S. Treasury to Take Steps to Avoid Borrowing Limit

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said in a letter Wednesday to congressional leaders that the department will use accounting measures to save approximately $200 billion, which could keep the government from reaching the limit for about two months.

Fiscal Cliff 'Cliffs Notes': How We Got to the Edge in 5 Easy Steps

Back in July 2011, President Obama and Congress set the country on autopilot toward economic Armageddon to give themselves an incentive to reach a budget deal. It didn't work. As we stare over the fiscal cliff, let's take a quick look back at the path we took to get here.

How Far Over the Fiscal Cliff Could Washington Go?

The dealmakers who warn that a year-end plunge off the "fiscal cliff" would be disastrous don't seem to be rushing to stop it. Why aren't they panicking? Because those master procrastinators know that Washington deadlines are rarely firm, and they know precisely how they can finagle more time.

The Higher the Debt Ceiling, the Deeper the Hole

When some new members of Congress recently declared their resistance to raising the nation's debt limit, it triggered warnings of "catastrophic consequences." Problem is, the higher this ceiling gets, the deeper the hole that the U.S. is digging itself into.