debt default

Bonds Are Riskier Than Ever. Here's Why.

Bonds have always had a reputation for being the safe investment, especially compared to stocks. But two recent events illustrate why that's just not the case anymore.

Markets Cautious Ahead of Debt Ceiling Vote

Stock markets traded cautiously on Wednesday ahead of a U.S. vote on raising the nation's borrowing limit temporarily. The House is set to vote on a motion to increase the nation's $16.4 trillion borrowing ceiling for three months.

Debt Crisis Looms as Congress Digs in Its Heels

Legislators show no signs they're heading toward compromise in resolving the nation's next financial crisis, with Democrats talking about further taxes hikes on the rich, and Republicans saying a crippling default on U.S. debt is possible unless they get significant cuts in government spending.

How Far Over the Fiscal Cliff Could Washington Go?

The dealmakers who warn that a year-end plunge off the "fiscal cliff" would be disastrous don't seem to be rushing to stop it. Why aren't they panicking? Because those master procrastinators know that Washington deadlines are rarely firm, and they know precisely how they can finagle more time.

Jobs of the Future: Film Offers a Bleakly Funny Outlook

Nobody knows what the next 30 years will look like, but Canadian filmmaker Jim Munroe offers some disturbingly possible speculations in his upcoming mockumentary, "Ghosts With Shit Jobs." Will 2040 be a time when over-educated Americans scurry after the few jobs that Chinese and Indian workers refuse to do?

10 Smart Places to Invest In Case the U.S. Defaults

The odds that the U.S. will default on its debt increase each day, and even if a short-term deal is reached, the ratings agencies may downgrade U.S. debt anyway. If that happens, turmoil could roil the markets. So where can the smart money flee for safety? 24/7 Wall St. offers 10 safe options.

Who Shouldn't U.S. Pay If Debt Deal Isn't Reached?

The debt ceiling debate is raging inside the Beltway, but many Americans are tuning it out. And among those paying attention, a majority would ignore the consequences and let the U.S. default. Find out who they'd chose to stiff first -- and tell us who you think the country shouldn't pay if it has to skip out on some of its obligations.

The Financial Landscape: Geithner Gossip Groundless

Citing unnamed sources, news outlets reported Thursday evening that Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner might leave the Obama administration soon. In response to the rumors, Geithner insisted, "I live for this work.... I'm going to be doing it for the foreseeable future."