debt crisis

Bank Shutdown Hammers Cyprus' Businesses

Banks across Cyprus remain locked Tuesday after financial authorities extended the country's bank closure, fearing worried depositors will rush to drain their accounts.

Young Adults are Too Broke to Get Loans

Young adults are in less debt than they were a decade ago, but it's not because they've suddenly become fiscally responsible. It's because their shaky economic status keeps them from qualifying for loans.

Voila! Bankrupt Cities Are Solvent Again! (Or Not)

Last month, Harrisburg, Pa., tried to throw in the financial towel and declare Chapter 9, but a judge threw out the bankruptcy petition. That doesn't mean the city is magically healthy again, though, and it's not the only municipality in similar straits. Here's why it matters to the rest of the country.

How U.S. Debt Stacks Up Against Other Nations

It's true that the U.S. has racked up the largest debt of any other developed country. But when you consider the debt in relation to the country's gross domestic product, it's only No. 7 on the list, according to Fortune.

How to Survive the Stock Market's Wild Ride

The stock-market roller coaster of the last couple of weeks -- culminating with Thursday's 500-point plunge on the Dow -- has been enough to make even the most stoic investors sweat. Experts offer opinions on how you can turn uncertainty into opportunity.

Debt-Ceiling Law: States Brace for Another Hit

The debt-ceiling discussions may be over, but the fallout for states is just starting. Many states, still struggling to recover to pre-recession levels, have depended on federal money to make up their shortfalls. As the flow of money slows, which states will take the biggest hits?

Wall Street May Be a Casualty of Debt-Ceiling War

Debt and government spending are firmly at the top of the new Congress's agenda. Just the threat that the U.S. wouldn't pay its bills has traders worried and wondering if the U.S. could end up on the same chaotic economic path taken by Greece or Spain.

Bank of England Keeps Rates Unchanged

The Bank of England said Thursday that it decided to keep its emergency stimulus program unchanged and the central bank's key lending rate at its record low of 0.5%.

What the Stocks vs. Dollar Seesaw Is Saying Now

For a host of reasons, when the dollar spikes, stocks drop, and when the dollar falls, stocks soar. Right now, with dollar sentiment reaching maximum bearishness, contrarians are preparing for the next seesaw shift. If the dollar rises again, stocks could reverse.

Greece Successfully Sells 1.25 Billion Euro of Bonds

Greece raised 1.25 billion euro ($1.57 billion) of bonds, its first debt auction since taking international bailout loans. The sale of 26-week treasury bills was oversubscribed 3.64 times, the Associated Press reported. The yield on the bonds was 4.65%.

Could Europe's Debt Crisis Cross the Atlantic?

Investors are growing increasingly concerned that the European banking and debt crisis could spell trouble for the U.S. economy. Substantial reform in the eurozone economies may be the only way to forestall the gathering storm.

U.S. Shouldn't Let Europe's Debt Crisis Go to Waste

The bond vigilantes have made their presence known in Greece, Spain, Portugal, Italy and Ireland, forcing up their borrowing costs and making slash budgets. The U.S. needs to act now to ensure it's not next.

Beyond Germany's New Ban Is a
Bigger Problem

Investors would be wise to look past the short-selling ban's particulars and focus more broadly on the rising anger in Germany particularly and the growing regulatory fervor that's catching on in Europe. None of this can be good for the financial sector.

Greece Under Attack From the Bond Vigilantes

As the bond vigilantes attack Greece, the European Union is preparing an emergency stabilization package to resolve the sovereign debt crisis. But he world's central banks must help involved too.

If the IMF Bails Out Europe, Who'll Bail Out the IMF?

The fund probably doesn't have the resources to bail out Greece, Portugal, Ireland and Spain. Which begs the question -- who rescues the IMF if it needs more stabilization funds to put out another fire? You guessed it: The U.S. is at the top of that list.

Europe Needs to Think Big About Its Bailout

Ratings downgrades for Spain, Portugal and Greece have alarmed already-rattled credit markets, sending borrowing costs sky-high. As contagion spreads, Europe's politicians need to stop dithering over the bailout and take dramatic steps to reassure markets.