Sbarro Again Files for Bankruptcy

Sbarro says it's filing for Chapter 11 reorganization, marking the struggling pizza chain's second trip through bankruptcy court in less than three years.

Buffett's Blind Spot: David Sokol's Unethical History

David Sokol, once considered a likely successor to Warren Buffett as CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, resigned this week from Berkshire under a cloud of possible insider trading charges. But these recent ethical lapses are hardly the worst of Sokol's business transgressions.

Why a New York Judge Is Throwing Out Foreclosure Cases

On Oct. 20, New York courts ordered attorneys for foreclosing banks to swear they'd personally confirmed that their documents are true and accurate. But a Brooklyn judge has taken things a step further. Since the banks aren't complying, he has started throwing out foreclosure cases.

Big Banks to New Jersey: Stop Bugging Us About Foreclosures

When New Jersey tightened its foreclosure rules in response to the false document crisis, it ordered the six largest servicers to explain why they should be allowed to continue foreclosing on homes. Their response: 'Trust us, everything's fine now.' If you think there's irony in that assertion, read on ...

Toyota Asks Court to Toss Unintended Acceleration Lawsuits

Toyota is asking a federal court in California to dismiss lawsuits claiming that electronics -- not floor mats or sticky gas pedals -- are the cause of unintended acceleration in its vehicles, saying plaintiffs have not proved there's a design defect in the vehicles' electronic systems.

Toyota Wants Lawsuits Thrown Out

=Toyota has asked a federal court to dismiss lawsuits seeking damages related to the recall of millions of vehicles for possible unintended acceleration. The automaker has a simple argument: No one has ever demonstrated what is wrong with Toyota's cars, if anything.

Daimler Wins $324 Million Appeal in Chrysler Deal Suit

German automaker Daimler has won its appeal of a court ruling that would have required the German automaker to pay $324 million to former Daimler-Benz shareholders who claimed they weren't adequately compensated in the $36 billion merger that created DaimlerChrysler.

Court Clears Path to Sale of England's Liverpool Football Club

A London court ordered the owners of Liverpool Football Club to reverse changes to the club%u2019s board, a move that could allow England%u2019s most successful soccer club to be sold to the group that controls the Boston Red Sox. Tom Hicks and George Gillett, the owners of the club, sought to block a 300 million pound ($476 million) sale to New England Sports Ventures, saying the bid was too low.

Facebook CEO: 'We' Did Not Sign Contract

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday dismissed the notion that he, or more precisely "we," ever signed a contract that could ultimately give ownership of his social networking company to New York businessman Paul Ceglia.

Legal Briefing: Court Gives the OK for 'Indecency' on TV

When the FCC decided in 2004 to start fining broadcasters over the use of fleeting expletives, the agency became a caricature of a state censor. Now, the Second Circuit has ruled that the 'indecency' policy was unconstitutionally vague. So what's next for dirty words?

Why Going Private Could Be Barnes & Noble's Best Bet

With its stock plunging and the trial between key shareholder Ron Burkle and top company executives about to take place in court, signs point ever more clearly to the possibility that Barnes & Noble will go private. And that just might be the best step for the company to take.

AstraZeneca Stock Jumps After Court Ruling on Crestor

AstraZeneca shares surged by almost 9% Tuesday after the company scored a win in court regarding the patent for its cholesterol treatment, Crestor. The ruling means that AstraZeneca won't have to worry about generic competition for its multibillion-dollar statin until 2016.