corporate profits

What Makes a Perfect Stock?

Yet while few stocks have everything one might want in an investment, knowing the most desirable traits of great stocks can guide you in making choices for your own portfolio.

How the IRS Takes the Gold After the Olympics

Team USA's biggest winner of the London Olympic Games may be the IRS. Our Olympic medalists will rake in handsome rewards for representing their country, but they will also have to give a chunk back to Uncle Sam in taxes -- even though they earned the cash overseas.

The Global 500: No Borders, No Boundaries

Despite financial turmoil in Europe and disasters in Japan, the world's largest corporations had record profits and revenue in 2011. Where on Earth will the growth come from next?

Average Joe CEO Made $9.6 Million in 2011

Profits at big U.S. companies broke records last year, and so did pay for CEOs. The head of a typical public company made $9.6 million in 2011, according to an analysis by the AP using data from Equilar, an executive pay research firm.

The Financial Landscape: An Economic Spilt Personality

Is the American recovery fast or slow? Depends on who you ask. The Wall Street Journal sees corporate America merrily rolling along while Main Street suffers. The New York Times warns that Wall Street is about to feel the pinch too. But nobody is all that optimistic about Greece today.

The Sorry State of America's Wage Earners

Everyone knows that the typical American household has been running in place or falling behind financially, thanks to stagnant wages and rising prices. But a new study from the the Economic Policy Institute shows that the problem has been endemic not for years, but for decades.

It's Not Too Late to Buy Into the Bullish Stock Market

The S&P 500 has nearly doubled from its post-crash lows, and small investors are finally getting off the sidelines again. Normally, that would be a danger sign for a correction, but right now, all signs point to the upward stock market trend continuing in 2011. Here's why:

Looking Beyond the Political China-Bashing

The grandstanding is understandable enough for politicians facing an electorate battered by the Great Recession. But China's growth is fueling the strong results that companies continue to deliver. And China's global trade surplus has actually been shrinking.

Another Earnings Season, Another Subdued Market?

The S&P 500 gained about 13% last year, but it didn't get much help while companies were releasing results. But it didn't get much help while companies were releasing results. The broader market was actually unchanged or lower for all four of 2010's earnings seasons.

2010's Person and Story of the Year, Plus a Bubble-Bursting Prediction for 2011

It's the season for reviewing the year that's ending and making predictions for the one ahead. On Tuesday, venture capitalist and DailyFinance columnist Peter Cohan was part of a TV panel that was asked: Who was the person of the year? What was the story of the year? And what will happen in 2011? Here are his answers.

America's Low Interest Rates Have a High Hidden Price

Interest rates are the price of money, and though that price is near zero right now, the cost of low interest rates to our nation may be too high. Low rates are squeezing savers, seniors, banks and pension funds, and the benefits we're supposed to see from them don't appear to have arrived.

Record Corporate Profits Are Coming Out of Workers' Hides

The Commerce Department reports that U.S. corporate profits have hit historic highs, so why isn't the GOP -- the party of business -- celebrating? After all, those profits are coming not from revenue growth -- which would benefit workers and executives -- but from cost cutting.

Why Earnings Are Booming Amid a Tepid U.S. Economy

The "new normal" coined by Pimco posited a long era of diminished earnings and stock prices as overleveraged consumers and companies cut back spending. But it's not playing out that way. It seems Corporate America is growing less and less dependent on America.

Budget Deficit Dips More Than Expected

Investors received another slice of good news Monday about the U.S. economy: The federal budget deficit for August totaled a smaller than expected $90.5 billion, thanks to rising government revenues due to higher tax receipts from stronger corporate profits.

Does Investor Gloom Mean
It's Time to Buy?

Investors' spike in gloom seems out of line with broader economic developments that continue to be mixed. So stocks may be undervalued because investors are being overly conservative -- and this could be a good time to buy.

Weak Economic Growth Will Hit Corporate Profits

If you've been wondering how corporations can be enjoying a sharp rebound in profits even as the U.S. economic recovery remains so weak David Rosenberg of Gluskin Sheff has your answer: They won't be enjoying it for much longer.

Slower Growth Ahead.
But a Double Dip Is Unlikely

It doesn't seem right that a slowdown in the U.S. economy could come as soon as the end of the year. Despite strong earnings at some companies, job creation hasn't recovered. But a slowdown is more likely than the worse prospect, a double-dip recession.

GDP Growth Unexpectedly Revised Down to 2.7%

The U.S. economy grew at a revised 2.7% annual rate in the first quarter, less than the previously estimated 3% rate. The weaker growth performance will likely intensify the debate about the recovery%u2019s status.