core inflation

Falling Food, Gas Costs Push U.S. Wholesale Prices Lower Again

U.S. wholesale prices fell for the third month in a row in December, propelled by falling food and gas costs. The drop is the latest evidence inflation is tame, which means consumers have more money to spend. Low inflation also gives the Federal Reserve more freedom to keep interest rates low.

Higher Gas Costs in August Push Consumer Price Index Higher

More expensive gas drove up consumer prices in August by the most in three years. But outside of energy costs, inflation was tame. The CPI rose a seasonally adjusted 0.6% last month, the first increase since March and higher gas prices accounted for 80% of the increase.

Falling Gas Keeps U.S. Consumer Prices Flat in June

U.S. consumer prices were flat in June as the cost of gasoline dropped, offering some relief for cash-strapped Americans and scope for the Federal Reserve to ease monetary policy further to help the faltering recovery.

Better Inflation Gauge Shows Why Inflation's Much Worse

One of the biggest threats to your financial health is inflation, which destroys the value of your money. Now, according to the Consumer Price Index, inflation is fairly tame. But if that doesn't reflect your economic reality, the people who created the Everyday Price Index think they know why.

Fed Nearing a Plan to Clarify Direction of Rates

The Federal Reserve under Ben Bernanke has gone further than ever to explain its policies to the public. It's ready to go further still. A Fed policy meeting Tuesday will likely focus in part on an evolving plan to reveal the direction of interest rates more explicitly.

Food and Gas Cost More in September

Consumers paid more for food and gas last month, although inflation outside those volatile categories was tame. The Labor Department says the Consumer Price Index rose 0.3% in September, below August's 0.4% rise. Excluding food and energy, so-called core prices increased 0.1%, the smallest rise since March.

Can the Fed Keep Downplaying Inflation?

When a Federal Reserve committee meets Tuesday to consider the federal interest rate, it will likely revise its glum outlook into something brighter. But will it also acknowledge the U.S.'s growing inflation problem?

Is Inflation Really 1.6%, or Is the BLS Getting Scammed?

Government measures show that inflation, at 1.6% in January, is still below the Fed's target of 2%. But commodity prices are soaring, and anyone who pays their household bills knows that food and energy prices are rising because of it. Is the Consumer Price Index getting it wrong?

Can the U.S. Sidestep Growing Global Inflation?

Rising food and energy prices will likely hit America the same way they've hit other countries. Other inflationary forces are more variable from nation to nation. Still, the U.S. can't fully escape rising prices, especially when it comes those common consumer necessities.

Will the Fed's New Hawks Force a Change of Course?

While most analysts don't expect a major departure from the December Fed meeting, the voting lineup has changed substantially. Now, Chairman Bernanke has to deal with three new members of the rate-setting committee who have expressed reservations about quantitative easing.

Weak Income and Spending Data May Push Fed to Move

September's personal income and spending report provided more evidence of a U.S. economy that's suffering from a lack of demand. The poor report will likely support the argument of Fed officials who want to keep interest rates low and employ more quantitative easing.