copper

Gold Tops the List of the Fourth Quarter's Likely Winners

Most commodities rallied in the third quarter, but can they hold on to their advance? Read on, and find out which ones still have legs to dance their way higher, and which are poised to take a tumble. The short answer to that from analysts is that gold and oil are likely to advance, while grains and sugar are among those that probably won't, but there will be a lot of different factors to consider.

Slackening Copper Demand in China Hurts Commodities Investors

Many small investors have recently piled into commodities, especially copper, on the assumption that ever-growing demand from developing countries would keep sending prices skyward. Now they are learning a drop in demand is also possible, and prices have been plummeting.

Inflation Warning: Should the Fed Raise Interest Rates?

It's no surprise that consumer prices are rising -- the prices of commodities from cotton to copper are near record levels, thanks to shrinking supplies and rising demand worldwide. The question is whether the Fed will raise rates to combat this price inflation -- and whether it should.

What Ron Paul Wants: A Quartet of U.S. Currencies

According to two Paul supporters, the Texas Republican isn't ready to go directly back to the gold standard. Instead, he wants to keep the dollar and add three more currencies. Those would be based on gold, silver and copper.

Copper Stockpiles Grow in Asia, Commodity Shares Fall

In Asia Thursday Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index fell 1.3% and China's Shanghai Composite shed 0.5%, as copper slid for a third day and banks retreated on reports that China has clamped down on loans. In Japan the Nikkei 225 Index inched up 0.1%.

What It Will Take to Tap Afghanistan's Potential Mineral Riches

Newly-located mineral deposits in Afghanistan could mean new wealth for an impoverished nation that has been crippled by decades of war. But getting those riches out of the ground will require years of development and billions of dollars in investment.

China to Benefit from Afghan Mineral Riches

The conflict in Afghanistan has cost the U.S. more than $940 billion, but recently, Americans have discovered that nation is sitting on upwards of $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits. But the resources we've found are are likely to end up getting mined by Russian and Chinese firms.