consumers

5 Ways Money Can Buy Happiness

Money can buy happiness: The trick is spending it right, say professors Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton, authors of "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending."

U.S. Consumer Spending Rose 0.8 Percent in September

Americans increased their spending in September at twice the rate that their income grew, a sign of confidence in the economy. Still, consumers made up the difference by saving less for a third straight month, a troubling trend.

Do You Really Want Walmart on Your Facebook Wall?

Shopping at Walmart is your guilty pleasure, but would you share with your Facebook friends which store in the chain is your very favorite? The world's biggest retailer hopes you will, and it's launching more than 3,500 store-specific Facebook pages to connect shoppers with what's happening in their local aisles.

Coffee Still Reigns as U.S. Java King

Despite the specialty-coffee craze for lattes, cappuccinos and other blended and frozen drinks, most caffeine addicts still opt for a regular cup of coffee, according to a new survey by Technomic.

Fed Leaves Rates Alone, Consumers Keep Status Quo

The Federal Reserve announced Wednesday that it would leave interest rates unchanged -- for now. For consumers, that means a holding pattern for the near term, with little impact on borrowing, great rates for mortgages, and no hikes for credit cards. By end of summer, that may change.

Gas Prices Drain U.S. Consumers' Tax-Cut Savings

Americans are earning and spending more, but a lot of the extra money is going down their gas tanks. Gas prices have drained more than half the extra cash Americans are getting this year from a cut in Social Security taxes.

Consumers Are Finding Cash for 'Small Luxuries'

As the economy improves, Americans have begun splurging again. But they're limiting their indulgences to haircuts, casual dining and coffee, while continuing to forego many bigger expenditures, like vacations and dining at expensive restaurants.

Consumers, Not Stocks, Will Feel Inflation's Pain First

Amid a bounce back in manufacturing activity, surging commodity prices are leading to fears of inflationary forces. Those forces are real, but corporate profits -- and therefore, stock prices -- won't suffer too quickly. The pain for struggling Americans, though, could be rapid and severe.