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What Was Wall Street Thinking Last Week?

There's never a shortage of silliness when it comes to Wall Street. Some of last week's biggest surprises and head-shaking blunders included a farcical mistake on the AP's list of same-store sales for September, Apple's failure to deliver the iPhone 5, Comcast's plan to charge $60 for a movie, and Best Buy's music streaming surrender.

Next Week's Big News: Cable TV, China.com, More

Plenty of big names are set to report their earnings in August, including the country's largest cable and satellite television providers, several of China's leading dot-coms, radio giant Sirius XM, car rental companies Zipcar and Avis, and the two biggest video game developers.

Redbox Runover in the Works?

There's trouble brewing at Redbox: President Mitch Lowe has announced his resignation, and parent company Coinstar revised its second-quarter revenue outlook downward last week. Here are some key signs consumers and investors should watch to see if the Redbox business model (i.e. kiosk rental machines) is obsolete.

Comcast, Skype Hope We'll Buy HD Video Phone on TV

Comcast has announced that it will soon offer a high-def Skype video calling service on the TVs of its cable customers. But will people have any interest in using Skype on their televisions when they can already use it on mobile devices and PCs?

Should Netflix Be Afraid of YouTube's Movie Rentals?

Google's video-sharing site, YouTube, is giving Netflix investors a little scare with its recent announcement that it has doubled the number of movie titles in its rental library to 6,000. But could YouTube's strategy be successful enough that it could directly compete with Netflix?

What If AT&T's T-Mobile Buyout Gets Shot Down?

Regulators have begun to take a long, hard look at whether the AT&T buyout of T-Mobile would create a quasi-monopoly in the American cellular carrier industry. If those antitrust concerns sink the deal, AT&T could be in real trouble, because cellular is its only clear hope for growth.

After Blockbuster Deal, Dish Is Set to Take on Netflix

Most subscribers to Dish Network probably picked the satellite television provider based on its low cost. But now that Dish has bought the library of one-time movie rental powerhouse Blockbuster, it's poised to compete with the likes of Netflix for the streaming-video market.

Coke Takes the Fizz out of Berkshire Hathaway

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway liquidated its positions in a number of high-profile companies during the fourth quarter, but the Oracle of Omaha's huge stake in Coca-Cola has caused his portfolio to lose its fizz so far in 2011.

Buffett Dumps Bank of America, Nike and More

In his latest stock holding update the billionaire investor disclosed that he has liquidated his investments in several big household names. The moves, however, may be linked to the retirement of longtime Berkshire Hathaway executive Lou Simpson.

Week Ahead: Earnings from Dell, Smucker's and More

Dell will highlight a handful of tech company results this week. Also reporting earnings will be food giants Smucker and Campbell Soup, also Marriott and other members of the lodging and hospitality industry, and the first of a long string of results from retailers.

Comcast's Next Big Battle May Be in Its Backyard

Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia channel is now the exclusive carrier of games from the Philadelphia Phillies, Flyers and 76ers. But now Comcast will have to make the channel available to satellite-TV providers, thanks to FCC-approved terms of its deal for NBC Universal.

Can Al Jazeera Capitalize on Its Newfound Popularity?

The Qatar-based network is getting international kudos for its coverage of the growing Middle East crisis. But acclaim and a growing audience don't yet equal profits and market share for Al Jazeera, which has almost certainly been losing money since its launch in 1996.

11 People to Watch in Business for 2011

They may not make the headlines, but the folks on this list of key corporate executives will likely have an outsize impact across all sectors of American business in 2011 -- from communications to household products to fast food to social networking.

CEOs 'Encouraged' by Business Talks with Obama

The CEOs of 18 big companies, including Google, Boeing and General Electric, met with President Barack Obama to discuss the U.S. economy and the country's international competitiveness Wednesday.

Four Stocks to Buy After CEOs Meet With Obama

The CEOs of 20 companies are visiting the White House Wednesday, and those executives will try to get something in return for the political cover they're giving President Obama. That could mean higher earnings for their shareholders down the road -- so which ones should you have in your 2011 portfolio?

The News Biz Glimpses a Cable-TV Model in the Booming iPad News Apps

Apple has just annointed Flipboard, an innovative news aggregation app, as its App of the Year. It's just one of several such apps that sort of mimic how cable companies operate as bundlers of content. And therein lies the promise of a mass, ad-supported business model.