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PayPal Jumps to TVs With TiVo- Comcast Shopping Collaboration

If you think QVC is a state-of-the-art way to shop through your TV, just wait until you see what PayPal has in store: It's working with TiVo and Comcast on ways to let consumers really engage with commercials, and make transactions possible with a click of your remote.

The Worst Company in America: It's Not a Bank or a Retailer

After a March Madness-like five-round poll, the Consumerist.com voters have picked the worst company in the country. And you may be surprised by which one beat out such hated corporate heavyweights as Bank of America, AT&T and Walmart.

'The Lorax': He's Bigger Than You Think

The Lorax raked in $70.2 million in ticket sales this weekend, making the animated feature film the year's biggest theatrical opening so far. That's good news for Comcast's Universal Studio and it's probably just the beginning.

No Video Streaming Service Will Ever Fit All

It's getting pretty crowded in the streaming space. Comcast is the latest company to throw its hat into the digital ring: It will offer existing cable subscribers access to streaming TV shows and movies through a new service called Streampix. And other streaming services, from Netflix to YouTube, are offering original content.

Verizon-Redbox Deal Adds to Online Video Choices

Verizon and Coinstar are joining forces in a new Internet streaming video venture built around Redbox's DVD-rental kiosks. Details are sketchy so far, but it will bundle streaming and DVDs, and it'll probably cost less than dominant player Netflix's service.

Disney Comcast Pact Is a Mickey Mouse Deal for Subscribers

Comcast just signed a major new deal with Disney that will give subscribers to the country's largest cable provider access to a ton of content across a range of devices -- not just TVs. Of course, those customers are sure to end up paying for it in higher cable bills.

Disney and Comcast Reach a Long-Term Deal

The Walt Disney Co. said Wednesday that it reached a long-term agreement with the nation's largest TV signal provider, Comcast Corp., that extends their partnership into the next decade. The deal covers major pay channels ESPN, Disney Channel and ABC Family and the retransmission of free ABC broadcast network programs through seven ABC TV stations. It allows Comcast subscribers to gain greater access to shows on demand over the Internet on multiple devices.

Really Mobile Quarterbacks: Super Bowl to Be Streamed

Forget the screen pass. When Super Bowl XLVI rolls around in February, you may find yourself calling an audible for a stream pass instead. The NFL is making its biggest game available as a legal stream for the first time ever.

Cost of Cable Bundling: $100 a Year for Sports, Whether You Watch or Not

Even though your cable, satellite, or broadband television provider may be despised for completely legitimate reasons, when it comes to your ever-rising bill, the providers are mostly just passing along the scaling programming costs of networks. As The New York Times reports, "American television subscribers pay, on average, about $100 a year for sports programming %u2014 no matter how many games they watch."

Is ESPN Charging a Tax on Every U.S. Household?

The next time you find yourself bellyaching over your expanding monthly cable bill, don't blame your provider. Blame ESPN, the biggest offender when it comes to basic cable, setting distributors back $4.69 a month for every subscriber.

Google May Be Your Next Cable Television Provider

If you're fed up with escalating cable bills, fuzzy satellite TV reception, and unresponsive customer service, Google is starting to think inside the box: The world's leading search engine may be ready to launch a broadband television service as early as next year.

Why Comcast Will Never Be Great Again

It isn't easy being a cable and Internet service provider these days. Consumers are turning to cheaper options, and they're tired of paying for channels they never watch. Networks are demanding more money. Add in performance issues, it's no surprise cable companies and wireless carriers among the country's most hated companies.

Can Comcast Cope With All the Cable Cord-Cutters?

Don't look now, but the cord-cutting trend continues for Comcast. Though the country's largest cable provider tried to mask its woes with upbeat spin in its quarterly report, Comcast is serving 577,000 fewer households than it was a year ago.

U.S. Workers Lost $38 Billion in Wages Waiting for the Cable Guy Last Year

Waiting for the cable guy, the Internet guy, or the air conditioner guy are tedious life necessities, like doing laundry or visiting the in-laws. But they are vastly more expensive. According to a new poll, American workers lost a total of $37.7 billion waiting around for in-house appointments in 2011.

Why Movie Watchers Are Abandoning the Multiplex

Noticed that your local movie theater is a little quieter than usual lately? Don't go thinking that moviegoers have just gotten more considerate. The reason phones aren't ringing, babies aren't wailing, and know-it-alls aren't giving away plot twists before they happen is simple: People just aren't there.

5 Dates to Watch This Earnings Season

It's been awfully quiet on the earnings front in recent weeks, and there's a reason: This is the time of year when accountants are nailing down the financials for the fiscal quarters that ended in September. Later this week, the conference calls will begin trickling in, and then it will be a deluge of quarterly reports until early November.

What Was Wall Street Thinking Last Week?

There's never a shortage of silliness when it comes to Wall Street. Some of last week's biggest surprises and head-shaking blunders included a farcical mistake on the AP's list of same-store sales for September, Apple's failure to deliver the iPhone 5, Comcast's plan to charge $60 for a movie, and Best Buy's music streaming surrender.

Next Week's Big News: Cable TV, China.com, More

Plenty of big names are set to report their earnings in August, including the country's largest cable and satellite television providers, several of China's leading dot-coms, radio giant Sirius XM, car rental companies Zipcar and Avis, and the two biggest video game developers.

Redbox Runover in the Works?

There's trouble brewing at Redbox: President Mitch Lowe has announced his resignation, and parent company Coinstar revised its second-quarter revenue outlook downward last week. Here are some key signs consumers and investors should watch to see if the Redbox business model (i.e. kiosk rental machines) is obsolete.

Comcast, Skype Hope We'll Buy HD Video Phone on TV

Comcast has announced that it will soon offer a high-def Skype video calling service on the TVs of its cable customers. But will people have any interest in using Skype on their televisions when they can already use it on mobile devices and PCs?

Should Netflix Be Afraid of YouTube's Movie Rentals?

Google's video-sharing site, YouTube, is giving Netflix investors a little scare with its recent announcement that it has doubled the number of movie titles in its rental library to 6,000. But could YouTube's strategy be successful enough that it could directly compete with Netflix?

What If AT&T's T-Mobile Buyout Gets Shot Down?

Regulators have begun to take a long, hard look at whether the AT&T buyout of T-Mobile would create a quasi-monopoly in the American cellular carrier industry. If those antitrust concerns sink the deal, AT&T could be in real trouble, because cellular is its only clear hope for growth.

After Blockbuster Deal, Dish Is Set to Take on Netflix

Most subscribers to Dish Network probably picked the satellite television provider based on its low cost. But now that Dish has bought the library of one-time movie rental powerhouse Blockbuster, it's poised to compete with the likes of Netflix for the streaming-video market.

Coke Takes the Fizz out of Berkshire Hathaway

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway liquidated its positions in a number of high-profile companies during the fourth quarter, but the Oracle of Omaha's huge stake in Coca-Cola has caused his portfolio to lose its fizz so far in 2011.

Buffett Dumps Bank of America, Nike and More

In his latest stock holding update the billionaire investor disclosed that he has liquidated his investments in several big household names. The moves, however, may be linked to the retirement of longtime Berkshire Hathaway executive Lou Simpson.