coca-cola

America's 7 Most Profitable Products

Successful companies may become giants, with large catalogs of products, but they frequently rely heavily on just one brand for a major chunk of their sales and profits.

Coke Touts Its Anti-Obesity Role - As It Lobbies for Giant Sodas

Coca-Cola's latest ad is 2-minute commercial touting it's commitment to reducing obesity by offering diet alternatives and smaller portion sizes. So why is the beverage giant also pouring money into a campaign to overturn New York City's ban on giant-sized, sugary drinks?

These Machines Are Making Coke and Pepsi Quake

More and more consumers are sidestepping the soda aisles at the supermarket, choosing instead to conveniently make carbonated beverages at home. If you haven't jumped on the bandwagon yet, here are five reasons that may change sooner than you think.

Dow 13,000: What It Means to You

On Tuesday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at 13,005, the first time it had crossed the 13,000 line since its plummet as the nation sank into financial crisis. But what is the Dow, anyway? And what are these "points" it's measured in? Allow us to explain...

10 Firms in the 'Ultimate Stock Pickers' Portfolio

There's a lot of overlap among the holdings of Morningstar's 26 highly rated funds, and these 10 stocks top the list. So if you want to follow the pros, consider these -- all of them mega-cap stocks and ultra-conservative buys.

8 Brands That Blew the Most Money on Super Bowl Ads

Between 2002 and 2011, companies spent a whopping $2.5 billion on Super Bowl advertising; this year, a 30-second commercial cost an average of $3.5 million. But what do you get for all that cash. In the case of these eight major advertisers, not as much as they'd hoped.

Do Super Bowl Ads Score for Their Companies' Stocks?

The Patriots and Giants will interrupt the entertainment to run some football plays, but everyone knows the Super Bowl is all about the commercials, and at $3.5 million for 30 seconds, sponsors must think they'll get their money's worth. But will their shareholders feel the same way?