class action

Financial Meltdown Accountability: Bring On the Class Actions!

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission's report concludes that ineffective regulators and big banks were the primary causes of the financial meltdown. Next stop: Government and class action lawsuits to recoup some of what we all lost, and (please please please) criminal charges against the worst offenders too.

Bank of America Sued Over Home Loan Modifications

Bank of America's persistent failure to modify home loans has resulted in the inevitable: a consumer class action lawsuit. Last week, Susan Fraser of Missouri filed suit on behalf of herself and other qualified homeowners whom the bank failed to give permanent loan modifications to.

Most FedEx Ground Drivers Lose in Class-Action Case

Right now, millions of Christmas presents are zooming around the country in FedEx trucks -- driven, one might think, by FedEx employees. However, it turns out the employment status of those drivers depends on which state they are working in, and according to a judicial ruling issued Tuesday, most are independent contractors.

Toyota Asks Court to Toss Unintended Acceleration Lawsuits

Toyota is asking a federal court in California to dismiss lawsuits claiming that electronics -- not floor mats or sticky gas pedals -- are the cause of unintended acceleration in its vehicles, saying plaintiffs have not proved there's a design defect in the vehicles' electronic systems.

Jury Rejects Bank's 'Meltdown Defense' in Fraud Case

In a case with wider implications for the financial industry, jurors in a class-action securities fraud suit found that BankAtlantic Bankcorp was liable to shareholders for about $42 million for making false statements about the bank's real estate portfolio and net income.

Madoff Investors Sue SEC for Incompetence

A Boston-based law firm announced a lawsuit Friday against the Securities and Exchange Commission on behalf of investors conned by Bernie Madoff. The suit brought by Kacheroo Legal Services seeks class-action status, and if it goes forward, it will be the first such suit ever.

Google Toolbar Spurs Another Privacy Lawsuit

Google has been slapped with another privacy lawsuit, this time over its toolbar, Bloomberg reported Tuesday. A New York man alleges the toolbar software transmits users' Internet activity to the company, and misleads people into believing they can prevent that transmission.

Forget Managing Modifications. BofA Doesn't Have the Staff for Banking

A lack of staff in the face of overwhelming volume is the excuse banks give for turning to robo-signers to speed foreclosures, and for their inability to manage the the mortgage modification process. Now, a class action against BofA raises questions about its core business as well.

Robo-Signing: Class Actions Raise More Troubling Questions

Lender Processing Services plays a key role in the mortgage foreclosure process as a go-between for banks and lawyers handling foreclosures. But two class actions challenge how LPS and a similar firm do business. At stake: Potentially billions of dollars in attorney's fees.

Shareholders Sue Toyota Over Recall- Induced Stock Slide

Toyota may have repaired most of the cars it recalled for unintended acceleration problems, but it hasn't repaired its stock price, and U.S. shareholders have filed a class-action lawsuit against the automaker for failing to disclose what it knew about the defects.

A Victory Against False Advertising in Relacore Lawsuits

The N.J. Supreme Court gave a win to advocates of truth in advertising this week when it ruled that lawsuits against the maker of dietary supplement Relacore could go forward as a class action. Considering the way such lawsuits work, gaining that status is almost as important as the final verdict.

Legal Briefing: A Roundup of Labor-Related News

Labor Day isn't just about rounding out the summer season with a nice three-day weekend, of course. It's a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country", notes the Labor Department, and has been a national holiday for over 100 years. In that vein, here's a roundup of recent labor-oriented legal news:

Legal Briefing: AIG to Pay $725 Million Fraud Settlement, Eventually

In the settlement of a lawsuit that predates the financial meltdown, AIG has agreed to pay shareholders $725 million for years of fraudulent practices that led to investors loosing money on the stock. But they only get $175 million up front. The rest, they may wind up getting in shares of AIG.

Legal Briefing: iPhone Lawsuit Moves Forward

An antitrust class action against Apple and AT&T is going forward, charging that Apple's five-year exclusive agreement with AT&T makes a sham of the two-year contracts iPhone users sign with AT&T and is part of an effort to monopolize the iPhone market.

Legal Briefing: Schwab Settles Suit for 25 on the Dollar

While Goldman Sachs allegedly defrauded Wall Street's elite, it was Main Street investors who were duped by Charles Schwab. Schwab put more than $700 million of its clients' money in what it said was a "conservative" fund, but was really a high-risk bet on mortgage-backed securities.

Discrimination: How Much Might It Cost Wal-Mart?

The U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled that a class action by female workers against Wal-Mart can proceed. But no one seems to know have any clear idea of how much money might be at stake if it loses.