charles schwab

ETF Basics: How to Dissect an ETF Fact Sheet

You're thinking of investing in an exchange-traded fund, but what are the odds you're going to read the whole prospectus? Don't buy blind: The ETF fact sheet can give you much of the key information, if you know how to look.

Is the VIX Signaling the End of the Bull Market?

Is the market pullback that began on April 26 and accelerated wildly with Thursday's 1,000-point free-fall and recovery just part of a normal bull market correction, or is it confirmation that a bear market has begun? The VIX may have the answer.

Legal Briefing: Schwab Settles Suit for 25˘ on the Dollar

While Goldman Sachs allegedly defrauded Wall Street's elite, it was Main Street investors who were duped by Charles Schwab. Schwab put more than $700 million of its clients' money in what it said was a "conservative" fund, but was really a high-risk bet on mortgage-backed securities.

Lessons From Mint.com's Tax-Time Meltdown for Schwab Users

Popular online personal finance portal Mint.com has had problems for months getting account info for Schwab customers. As tax day approached, that annoyance became maddening, even though it wasn't all Mint's fault. Such is business on the Web today.

Today's 401(k) Investors Are in Control

Thanks to the financial crisis, 401(k) investors have gone from passive to take-charge. As the market swung wildly over the past two years, account holders shifted in and out of stocks, raised their bond holdings and made more use of investor tools, among other changes.

Rebound Is Real, but Watch for Rising Rates

The bears aren't giving the recovery any respect, leading Schwab's Liz Ann Sonders to call it the "Rodney Dangerfield" recovery. She rebuts that position, but notes that the end of the Fed's easy money policy could be nearer than most think.

Do Free ETF Trades Have a Price Tag?

Charles Schwab drew first blood in the commission wars, offering free trades for its ETFs. Fidelity struck back with offers of 25 iShares exchange-traded funds commission-free. Should investors jump on these "free" offers? Hint: always read the fine print.

10 Rules You Need to Know Before Investing in ETFs

You're a savvy investor: You know your way around a mutual fund. But figuring out exchange-traded funds can be a whole different ballgame, so we've asked a few financial experts to help demystify the art of successful ETF investing.

Web Shoppers Are Happier These Days

If you're feeling better lately when you look at your Netflix queue, e-ticket or online stock portfolio, you're not alone. A new study says consumer satisfaction with online retailers is up, especially with online brokerages and travel-booking sites.

Is the All-ETF Portfolio a Good Idea?

Portfolios made up entirely of exchange-traded funds could have appeal, as ETFs often have lower expense ratios than many mutual funds and they trade throughout the day. But investors should be careful, as buying ETFs based on speculation that an industry or market segment may outperform can be dangerous.

Know the Providers Before Shopping for an ETF

As assets in U.S. exchange-traded funds hit a record of more than $700 billion last year, ETF providers are sprouting faster than you can say ETF boom. Indeed, there are now nearly 30.

Discount Brokers Pushing Savings Products

As the personal savings rate in the US has grown to 4.4% and continues to rise, Charles Schwab, TD Ameritrade and ING Direct are enticing investors to save a portion of that growing asset base with them.

Schwab Likely to Disappoint

Charles Schwab will likely come in below analysts' estimates when it releases fourth quarter earnings on Thursday. Among its problems: a slowdown in trading volumes and an acceleration of money market fund fee waivers.

Do ETFs Need Their Own Trade Group?

As ETFs absorb more money and attract more scrutiny, an independent trade organization may be necessary for their operators, both to market the popular new products and to educate consumers and advisers about their possible risks.

ETFs in 2010: Hot. Don't Get Burned

Providers of exchange-traded funds and notes had a strong 2009 and the new year is shaping up to bring more of the same. But what's good for ETF companies isn't necessarily good for investors.