Seven Bosses We'd Like to See Go Undercover

It's great fun to see big-shot CEOs get out of their corner offices on the TV hit, Undercover Boss. But it would be even more fun to see America's true corporate titans on the show. We imagine undercover assignments for Steve Jobs, Warren Buffett, BP's Bob Dudley and others.

Choice Hotels CEO Cleans Up His Act on Undercover Boss

Some CEOs look as though they've never done a day of manual labor in their lives, and Stephen Joyce, the head of Choice Hotels International is one of them. His week in the spotlight of "Undercover Boss" left him sweaty and distressed, and -- as usual -- put him in touch with soul of his company.

Political Ad Spending Will Fatten Broadcasters This Year

TV station political revenues may hit $2.5 billion in 2010, a 25% increase above 2006, SNL Kagan says. Among the biggest beneficiaries: conservative broadcaster Sinclair, which has the largest footprint of all independent station owners in areas with contested elections.

ABC News's David Westin: 'The Right Time' to Leave

ABC News President David Westin is leaving his job after 14 years. A corporate mandate to increase his division's profitability apparently conflicted with his own commitment to high-prestige journalism.

Emmy Awards Win with Jimmy Fallon

The Primetime Emmy Awards Show continues to rebound with host Jimmy Fallon. The bold and new, like Glee, were rewarded, while former favorites, like Lost, were forgotten.

An Emmy Win: It's More Than Just a Golden Statue

Prestige means a lot in Hollywood. TV companies use a show's Emmy Award to help sell commercial time, and advertisers enjoy the bragging rights of being associated with hot shows. Sometimes, an Emmy can even help a show avoid the ax.

Demand Media's Dumbest How-To Content

How much quality content can a penny buy? I trolled Demand Media's to answer that question. Here's my collection of the dumbest articles published by the company, which recently filed for an IPO.

News Corp.'s
$1 Million to the GOP: No Big Deal

It looks terrible when company that owns some of the nation's biggest news outlets drops a wad of cash in the lap of one political party. But when you get down to it, there's no reason News Corp.'s donation to the Republican Governors Association is any worse than what happens every day.

Sumner Redstone on Warpath Over Girl Band and The Daily Beast

Sumner Redstone, the billionaire chairman of Viacom and CBS, is on the warpath over a story in The Daily Beast. The story, written by Peter Lauria, said that Redstone, 87, was forcing MTV to take a documentary about girl band the Electric Barbarellas seeking a record deal. The story cited anonymous sources as saying that Redstone was smitten with the band, and was insisting that MTV take the "unwatchable" documentary.

Appeals Court Scraps FCC's TV Indecency Rules

In a major victory for TV networks, a federal appeals court struck down the Federal Communications Commission's indecency policy on Tuesday, calling it "unconstitutionally vague." The court also found the FCC rules posed a risk to freedom of speech.

Sumner Redstone: I'll 'Never Sell Viacom or CBS'

If there was any doubt that Sumner Redstone regards both CBS and Viacom as personal properties, he dispelled it Wednesday when he told CBS stockholders, "I will never, never sell Viacom or CBS."

Why a CBS and CNN Partnership Might Happen

CNN and CBS have unsuccessfully flirted with the idea of a partnership many times in the past. But now they're giving it another whirl. Could a recent fall in CNN's fortunes make it ready to commit?

Leno's Ratings Bump Isn't All Good News for NBC

Now that Jay Leno has returned to host NBC's Tonight Show, the show is climbing back to the top of late-night ratings. In March, Leno outdrew his main rival on CBS, The Late Show with David Letterman, averaging 4.9 million viewers compared with Letterman's 3.7 million viewers, according to Variety. But the top brass at NBC shouldn't feel vindicated in their decision to reinstall Leno in the 11:30 p.m. time slot quite yet.

1-800-Flowers' Undercover Boss Learns a Lesson

CBS's hit reality show "Undercover Boss" often features down-and-out employees whose personal stories eclipse the real problems occurring within the company. At times, these episodes seem contrived, but Sunday's episode, which featured Chris McCann, the president of 1-800 Flowers, is the exception.

No pay? Many interns say, 'No problem'

A recent article in the New York Times about the growth of unpaid internships has spurred an interesting debate among many people -- one that mirrors...

CEO Joel Manby: A Real "Undercover Boss" on a Seemingly Scripted Show

an out-of-touch executive who, while in disguise as one of his own workers, learns firsthand about the hardships his employees deal with every day. But when it came to the show's latest episode, which showcased Joel Manby the Chief Executive of theme-park operator Herschend Family Entertainment, the tables turned.

Tiger Announces His Return, and CBS Stock Roars

Almost every person or organization who benefits financially from professional golf was probably seriously miffed about Tiger Woods' infidelity scandal. But after his announcement Tuesday that he would be returning to golf at the Masters, at least one company must be doing a victory dance: CBS.

No Happy Ending to 2009 for Book Publisher Simon & Schuster

While parent company CBS ended 2009 with a modest 1% dip in sales, the same could not be said for its book publishing arm Simon & Schuster. For the fourth quarter ending Dec. 31, S&S reported sales of $220 million, a 10% drop (or $25 million) from the previous year, and profits of $13.6 million, more than half as much ($28.5 million) the company earned in 2008.

Controversial Super Bowl Ad Uses Athlete to Tackle Message

It was controversial for CBS to accept an anti-abortion ad from group Focus on the Family. But long before the game started, Focus had already accomplished its goal of communicating a pro-life message through the vehicle of affable college-football star Tim Tebow and his mother.

Do Super Bowl Commercials Really Work?

Are Super Bowl commercials still worth the jaw-dropping costs of $3 million and up for 30 seconds to reach 100 million viewers? Here's why only some advertisers will come away winners in the big game.