career

How Much Does Your Name Affect Where You Work?

Names define us, but do they determine our life choices? The idea that our names can influence those decisions is what psychologists call "implicit egotism." To test the concept, a recent study looked at how our names might affect where we choose to work. And what did the researchers find...?

Another Rough Summer Ahead for Teen Jobs

Teens hoping for employment this summer aren't likely to find the job market much better than last year, when teenage job seekers experienced the weakest seasonal market in decades.

Employers Win Workers
With Perks, Not Raises

To retain top employees and attract new ones, U.S. companies are increasingly turning to perks such as subsidized training and flexible work conditions rather than raises. These incentives are finding a welcome among employees, too, especially educational benefits.

State Worker Retirements Are Soaring Across the Country

As wages and benefits shrink, state workers are retiring in droves. On top of all the layoffs, these retirements amount to a huge brain drain of government employees, and the problem is likely to get worse given the yawning budget gaps of states from coast to coast.

Career Risk-Taking Hits a New Low, Thanks to the Still-Weak Economy

Whether it was a fresh startup or a fresh start, fewer Americans seemed willing to take career risks last year, according to a new report by Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The percentage of job-seekers starting their own businesses or relocating for new positions fell to historic lows in 2010.

People@Work: Construction Job Growth Is Slowly Rebuilding

New forecasts show that the worst may be over for the construction industry, which was hit harder by the Great Recession than any other sector, as construction projects slowly resume. Some 27% of construction firms say they plan to add staff this year, while only 20% plan to cut jobs.

Tech Sector Job Cuts Fell to Lowest Level Since 2000

Job cuts in technology fields came to just under 47,000 last year, the lowest total for the sector since 2000, according to employment-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Better still, during the next 10 years, the sector is forecast to experience one of the fastest paces of job creation of any industry.

People@Work: These Days, Even Promotions Are Harder to Come By

Fresh data show that the number of promotions given to American workers has dwindled, suggesting that even those with jobs are having a tough time getting ahead. Fewer promotions are "a sign of the lingering impacts of the recession," one expert says.

Job-Seekers Are Getting a Bit More Upbeat

A new survey by job-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas found the number of unemployed seeking work similar to what it found in 2009. Now, though, there's more optimism that a job will be found. Challenger agrees, but it notes the path is still long and difficult.

People@Work: Boomers Are Turning 65 -- but Staying on the Job

The dawning of 2011 marks a milestone: The first of the nation's 76 million baby boomers turn 65, the traditional retirement age. New polls, however, show that for a range of reasons few boomers of this age are ready to retire. In fact, some don't ever expect to stop working.

UBS to Employees: You Must Dress Like Bankers

In a bid to promote a more polished image, Swiss-banking giant UBS is giving employees a 43-page guide that advises them on how to dress to impress when dealing with clients, in extreme detail. Do: Wear jackets buttoned. Don't: Let underwear be seen.

The Growing Mismatch Between Jobs and Skills

In the U.S., 52% of companies report problems attracting critical-skill employees. Some of the hottest jobs over the next 10 to 15 years require tech skills that aren't gained at traditional manufacturing jobs. Here are some strategy's for getting those skills.

Recession Swells the Ranks of Breadwinner Wives

For married couples of opposite genders, the downturn's inordinate impact on men has resulted in an increasing number of wives becoming the primary breadwinner or returning to the labor market. Surprisingly, many men don't mind at all.