building permits

U.S. Housing Starts Dip But Remain at Solid Pace

U.S. homebuilders began work at a slower pace in January, though the level was still the third-highest since 2008. The pace of building was viewed as a sign of further strengthening in residential real estate.

Homebuilders Missing Out on the Economic Recovery

For homebuilders, it hardly feels like an economic recovery. Nearly two years after the recession ended, the pace of construction is less than half the level considered healthy. That weakness is weighing on the economy: Though new homes represent a small portion of overall sales, they have an outsized effect on jobs.

Housing Starts: Another Small Gain in November

The U.S. housing sector took another modest step forward in November as housing starts rose a better-than-predicted 3.9% to a 530,000-unit annual rate. Still, at the current rate of recovery, the nation remains about 18 months to 2 years away from seeing normal levels of home building.

New Housing Starts Plunged 11.7% in October

U.S. housing starts unexpectedly plunged 11.7% in October to a 519,000-unit annual rate, weighed down by a 47.5% decline in apartment and condo construction. But building permits, a leading indicator of future housing construction, did inch 0.5% higher last month. U.S. housing starts unexpectedly plunged 11.7% in October to a 519,000-unit annual rate, weighed down by a 47.5% decline in apartment and condo construction. But building permits, a leading indicator of future housing construction, did inch 0.5% higher last month.

Does the Housing Market Need More Federal Help?

The U.S. housing sector's road to recovery is getting rougher: Housing starts fell a worse-than-expected 5% in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 549,000. Permits for new single-family homes fell 3.4% to a 421,000 annual rate -- their lowest since April 2009.