bruce watson

A Boat, A Scot, and the World's Most Expensive Whisky

In honor of its 125th birthday, Glenfiddich -- the world's top-selling single malt scotch is auctioning off the most expensive whisky in the world. Only eleven bottles exist of Janet Sheed Roberts Reserve, a 55-year-old scotch.

Wedded Risk: You May Now Insure the Bride

In 2011, the average American wedding cost $26,501. With that kind of money on the line, and considering all the unforeseeable circumstances that could wreck your carefully laid plans, it's no surprise that a growing number of companies are offering wedding insurance.

Poor and Elderly: The 5 Worst States to Grow Old In

It's a tough time to be old in America, and it's worse than you may realize: According to a recent report, on average, if government benefits were taken out of the equation, the elderly would have far less income than they'd need to survive. Here's where the problem is worst.

Should the Government Give Colleges Value Report Cards?

More students and parents are approaching higher education like any other big investment -- one that requires serious research. Trouble is, the data can be hard to find -- and what's available isn't always trustworthy. Should Washington step in?

Taxing Cinema: The IRS Goes to Hollywood

Every year, tax season inspires Americans ... to gripe and complain. But rather than focus on the depressing side of your yearly ordeal, why not consider the more enjoyable things that taxes have inspired -- namely, a long list of films. On Oscar weekend, there's no better time to recall these taxing classics.

5 Offbeat Ideas for Saving on Gas From Our Readers

Gas prices are going up again, and it feels a lot like Groundhog Day: Same old problem, and media outlets are dispensing the same old advice. Not us! Here are the most interesting and innovative ideas our readers offered for reducing your pain at the pump.

Super PACs: New Rules, But an Old Political Game

Pundits have lately focused on the growth of super PACs -- and the power of the mega-rich men who fund them -- but the current business-sponsored presidential contest isn't unusual: There's a long and rich tradition of election-buying in American history.

Money and Power: Richest and Poorest U.S. Presidents

Being a U.S. president is a well-paying gig -- but it didn't pay off for all of them. Turns out, getting your face on our nation's currency doesn't always mean that much currency flowed your way. Here's our look at the White House's biggest fiscal winners ... and losers.

Rick Santorum: An Average Guy with Ordinary Taxes

Rick Santorum has rarely shied away from controversy in his political career, but there's no controversy to be found in his taxes. Based on his recently released returns, Santorum appears to have been a conscientious taxpayer, and a fairly normal (if a little wealthy) guy.

Valentine's Day Romance ... With a Side of Fries

Looking for a Valentine's Day plan that's budget friendly and romantic too? White Castle, Waffle House and Chik-Fil-A are all waiting to take your reservation for Feb. 14, and they're taking the holiday more seriously than you'd imagine.

How State Taxes Put a Bigger Pinch on the Poor

True, 47% of Americans pay no federal income tax. But, as a recent study points out, when all the other taxes we pay are factored in, the poor often pay a far greater percentage of their income in taxes than the rich.

Readers' Tips for Financial Revival, Part 4: Get a Job

The idea that you can't reach financial security without a job is a no-brainer, but in this economy, there's nothing simple about finding work. So even though it's a bit outside the usual "boost your finances" motif, we're passing on some reader suggestions on this topic, too.

All the Heart, Half the Cost: Your Budget Valentine Ideas

In search of gifts that say more about the heart than the wallet, we asked our readers for inexpensive but meaningful ideas for Valentine's Day. They came through with a number of fine ways to demonstrate your love without busting your budget.

Fee Backlash Cost Big Banks Over 2 Million Customers

Switching banks is a hassle, but outrage over the big financial institutions' efforts to pile on new steep fees pushed more than 2 million people to close their accounts over the past 3 months. Is Bank Transfer Day becoming Bank Transfer Year?

Readers' Tips for Financial Revival, Part 3: Investing

A few weeks ago, we asked DailyFinance readers for their best tips for putting your financial house in order. We've covered saving and spending wisely. Now, we move on to another key to long-term financial security: making your money work for you.

Share Your Ideas for a Sweet but Frugal Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day is coming, which means that millions of men are getting ready to drop money on Whitman's samplers and red roses. But there are other options out there -- and we know that our faithful readers have explored at least a few of them.

How Can You Get Mitt's Tax Rate? (Hint: You Can't)

Amid all the chatter about Mitt Romney's high income and low taxes, many have wondered why more Americans don't take advantage of those attractive capital gains rates. The answer is that most people can't -- at least not on a level large enough to make a difference in their finances.

Readers' Tips for Financial Revival, Part 2: Spend Wisely

A few weeks ago, we asked DailyFinance readers for their best tips for putting your financial house in order. First, we covered saving, but spending in the right way is just as important. Here are some of your best suggestions for managing how your money flows out.

Is Sheldon Adelson Trying to Buy the White House?

Casino mogul Sheldon Adelson has stirred up controversy recently for his $10 million in political help to the Newt Gingrich campaign -- but it's all perfectly legal. Still, with billionaires and corporations now able to make almost unlimited political donations, is the presidency for sale?

Readers' Tips for Financial Revival, Part 1: Smart Saving

A few weeks ago, we asked DailyFinance readers for their best tips for putting your financial house in order. Many were quick to note that the foundation of financial security lies in being ready when disaster hits. Here are some of their best suggestions for planning for those rainy days.

Older Workers Flock Back to School ... and Student Loans

The best route to a secure job still runs through the classroom, and droves of middle-aged Americans are following it. The proof is in the lending: The fastest growth in the student loan business is among people in their 40s. But are they making a good investment, or a bad bet?

State of the Ecomony: 3 Things Obama Will Focus On

In tonight's State of the Union, President Obama faces a tough crowd: Millions of Americans unsure about whether he should keep his job. He'll be aiming to win hearts and minds, and at least part of that will be an appeal to our wallets. With that in mind, here are three key points that he is likely to hammer home tonight:

Romney's Best Tax Break: Let's Talk 'Carried Interest'

Mitt Romney paid a lower tax rate on his $21.6 million income in 2010 than the average U.S. family. It's no secret how: He made his money from investments, not wages. But even people who favor low capital gains taxes might not approve if they understood more about a neat little income category he benefited from called "carried interest."

What Would You Do With a Billion Dollar Bank Error?

It's a cliche that dates back to Monopoly: A bank error in your favor. But for Parijat Saha, an Indian schoolteacher, the Community Chest card came to life in a big way when he discovered that his bank account suddenly held $9.8 billion.

What Unions Should Have Said in New Ad Campaign

Organized labor in the U.S. has been under sustained assault for some time; now, unions are fighting back with a major ad campaign designed to improve their image. Problem is, the centerpiece commercial mangles the message -- and misses the point.

New Safe-Sex Porn Law Could Cost L.A. Billions

Many industries complain that new government regulations are bad for business; now, we're hearing it from the adult film biz. A proposed L.A. city regulation to require porn actors to use condoms has adult film makers threatening to leave Tinseltown -- and to take the lion's share of an $8 billion-a-year industry with them.

It's Official: Wealth Gap Is Our No. 1 Source of Conflict

Do you think that the biggest conflict in America today is between the rich and the poor? If so, join the club: According to a recent Pew Research Center poll, 66% of Americans believe the wealth gap is the greatest cause of tension in this country.

OWS Prepares to Occupy Martin Luther King Jr. Day

It's been a rough few months for the social justice activists of Occupy Wall Street. But on Sunday and Monday, the movement will take to the streets again to honor one of America's most famous protesters: Dr. Martin Luther King.

3 Ways to Take Control of Your Finances in 2012

After the overindulgence of December, it's no surprise that so many people spend January trying to turn over new leaves. If you're ready to get your financial house in order, consider one of these three websites, each with a different take on helping you better manage your money.

Beyond Santorum's Sweater: 2012's Best Campaign Swag

This week, Rick Santorum grabbed headlines when he offered campaign donors the sweater vest off his back. But the former senator faces a tough fight in the campaign merchandise contest. As GOP primary season heats up, here's our rundown of the winners and losers in the battle of the campaign swag.