broadband

Google May Be Your Next Cable Television Provider

If you're fed up with escalating cable bills, fuzzy satellite TV reception, and unresponsive customer service, Google is starting to think inside the box: The world's leading search engine may be ready to launch a broadband television service as early as next year.

Why Comcast Will Never Be Great Again

It isn't easy being a cable and Internet service provider these days. Consumers are turning to cheaper options, and they're tired of paying for channels they never watch. Networks are demanding more money. Add in performance issues, it's no surprise cable companies and wireless carriers among the country's most hated companies.

Cable Companies to Offer $9.95 Broadband for Poor Homes

Cable companies said Wednesday that they will offer Internet service for $9.95 per month to homes with children that are eligible for free school lunches. The offer will start next summer and is part of an initiative the Federal Communications Commission cobbled together to get more U.S. homes connected to broadband.

Can Comcast Cope With All the Cable Cord-Cutters?

Don't look now, but the cord-cutting trend continues for Comcast. Though the country's largest cable provider tried to mask its woes with upbeat spin in its quarterly report, Comcast is serving 577,000 fewer households than it was a year ago.

Should Netflix Stream Its Video Business Into the U.K.?

Netflix is enjoying a period of rapid expansion, riding on the popularity of DVD-by-mail and online video streaming. The question for investors is: What's next? Netflix has signaled that it plans to expand abroad, and the U.K. is a likely target. But is Britain ready for Netflix?

What If AT&T's T-Mobile Buyout Gets Shot Down?

Regulators have begun to take a long, hard look at whether the AT&T buyout of T-Mobile would create a quasi-monopoly in the American cellular carrier industry. If those antitrust concerns sink the deal, AT&T could be in real trouble, because cellular is its only clear hope for growth.

Obama Wants to Use WiFi to Cut the U.S. Budget Deficit

U.S. President Barack Obama on Thursday proposed that the government auction off its portion of the wireless spectrum to private companies to boost access to high-speed Internet and cut the federal budget deficit.

Google Gets FCC Approval for White Space Internet

The Federal Communications Commission has granted permission for nine companies, including Google, to turn unused broadcast frequencies -- also known as "white spaces" -- into wireless broadband.

After GOP Kills Net Neutrality Bill, Focus Shifts Back to FCC

One day after Congressional Republicans killed compromise legislation that would have protected net neutrality -- the principle that broadband providers shouldn't play favorites with Web content -- pressure has returned to the Federal Communications Commission to act on the issue.

Inside the War Over the Internet's Future

Amid a fierce clash over the Net's next era, tech titans Google and Verizon crafted their own broadband policy plan and shined a light on what might be Washington's most ineffectual regulatory agency -- the FCC. Unknown to many, Google and Verizon worked on that plan since fall of 2008.

Telecom Lobbyists Hold Secret Internet Talks

Lobbyists from some of the largest U.S. technology companies are meeting behind closed doors in Washington with telecom giants to discuss net neutrality, following the failed FCC talks and Google's bilateral deal with Verizon. No surprise, public interest groups weren't invited.

How the FCC Bungled Net Neutrality

While often well-intentioned, the agency has watched its own "open Internet policy" slowly, but systematically, crumble over the last five years. Now under Julius Genachowski, the FCC faces an almost no-win situation regarding net neutrality.

The Google-Verizon Deal: Evil or Pragmatic?

The two companies were on traditionally opposite sides of the net neutrality debate. So they initiated a discussion with the goal of finding a compromise where some progress could be achieved in the face of FCC and congressional inaction.

The Coming Boom in Videoconferencing Technology

The concept of the videophone is nearly as old as the phone itself, and prototypes predate the Beatles by many decades. But while other new modes of communication, from email to instant messaging to cell phones have been adopted at astonishing rates, video has lagged -- until now.

FCC Blasted Again Over Closed-Door Internet Meetings

Public interest groups kept up their assault on the FCC's closed-door broadband policy meetings after the agency decided to bypass standard disclosure rules, effectively shutting out the public. One group took out a full page ad in The Washington Post blasting the meetings.

Legal Briefing: FCC Won't Force Broadband Competition

In order to enforce net neutrality rules, the FCC is reclassifying ISPs into the same category as phone companies. Now, the agency has the authority to drastically improve broadband competition -- but it won't.

Is the FCC a Threat to Homeland Security?

Editorials that have been forwarded to the media by the National Association of Broadcasters accuse the FCC of promoting broadband policies that reflect an anti-broadcast bias. Another charge: Broadband couldn't cope if a major national disaster were to strike.

A Bogus Take on Broadband and Net Neutrality

The government's plan to improve broadband speeds and access has triggered a wave of criticism from predictable quarters. Sam Gustin challenges a prominent example that's light on facts and heavy on ideological hot air.

FCC Delivers Broadband Plan to Congress

The Federal Communications Commission formally submitted its ambitious National Broadband Plan to Congress on Tuesday. Under the plan, the FCC aims to deliver beefed up and inexpensive Internet connections to every community in the U.S., and to make broadband available to every home.

U.S. Broadband Push Ruffles Feathers

The FCC outlined plans to deliver high-speed broadband service of up to 100 megabits per second to 100 million American households by the year 2020. But cable providers and TV broadcasters may not want the competition.