bonds vs stocks

Bonds Are Riskier Than Ever. Here's Why.

Bonds have always had a reputation for being the safe investment, especially compared to stocks. But two recent events illustrate why that's just not the case anymore.

How to Handle the Bond-Market Collapse

Most investors think stocks are riskier than bonds. Recently, that script has flipped. Here's what to do about the surprising losses from the "safe" portion of your portfolio.

Suddenly, Bonds are Riskier than Stocks

Bonds have outperformed stocks over the last 30-year period, but things are changing and bonds are no longer the safe haven they once were. In fact, bonds already look overvalued, and if rock-bottom interest rates keep moving higher, bond funds could plunge.

If You Haven't Done This Lately, Your Portfolio Is In Danger

2012 was a good year for the stock markets. But if you want to be prepared for the next correction, whenever it comes, there's one easy-to-implement strategy that has helped investors through the bumps and dips more than any other: rebalancing your portfolio.

Striking a Balance Between Stocks' Profits and Bonds' Safety

After getting hammered when stocks dove a few years ago, many investors scrambled for the safety of bonds. But now that stock markets have rallied, cautious investors are looking for ways to get some profits from equities while keeping conservative portfolios. A new variable annuity product from Western & Southern Financial Group may be just what they're looking for.

As Sentiment Shifts, Pension Funds Could Turn to Stocks

Now, even over-the-top bears like bond giant Pimco are doing a bullish about-face, and that makes it tougher for fund managers to keep avoiding the stock market. If they start returning to a historical stock allocation, that could further boost equity prices.

How the Bear Market Pundits Got It Wrong

The S&P 500 has rebounded 20% since its July 2010 low, which comes as bad news to perma-bears like Nouriel Roubini, Gary Shilling, and Bill Gross, all of whom predicted the opposite. This raises several questions about how stocks move, and why the pundits we hear say the things they do.

Stocks Are Becoming the Only Game in Town

Equities have finally put up decent-enough returns on the year to make the paltry yields on bonds almost impossible to tolerate. With rates so low now, more and more investors are moving from fixed income and back into the stock market.

What's Reviving Investors' Hunger for Stocks

Far-sighted investors are starting to see that the broader economic picture: a robust global rebound in manufacturing and impressive corporate earnings. These strong fundamentals are finally overcoming risk aversion -- and could set the stage for an equity rally.

The New Allure
of Emerging-Market Debt

Yields on emerging-market debt funds and exchange-traded funds are certainly enticing these days, especially compared to U.S. Treasurys. Also attractive are the added benefits of portfolio diversification and currency appreciation. But the risks can't be overlooked.

Buffett Touts Stocks, Warns Against Buying Bonds

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett said stock prices are likely to rise faster than bond prices, but that many investors are making the mistake of choosing to buy bonds due to a lack of confidence in the U.S. economy, CNBC reported.

Hedge Your Risk With Mixed-Asset Mutual Funds

With stocks underperforming so far in 2010, and Treasury bond yields low, too, Standard & Poor's Equity Research suggests investing in mixed-asset mutual funds, which hold a combination of stocks and bonds to capture the strengths of both asset classes with less volatility.

Wednesday's Stock Rally Is a Warning to Bond Bulls

Stocks enjoyed a respite from what some see as a bubble in pessimism, and that sudden turn should be unnerving to a fast-growing crowd of individual investors: those who have recently raced into ultrasafe holdings like U.S. government bonds.

Fear Is Rising, but Stocks Are Looking Cheap

Plenty of good news may be getting overlooked in a market gripped by one form anxiety after another. That pervasive fear has investors crowding into government bonds. It could also create a good window to get into undervalued stocks.

Stocks vs. Bonds: What's Better in a Rocky Market?

Interest rates are falling for Treasury bonds, beloved for their safety and steady payout. The stock market is wobbling, and equity prices may fall further if the economy continues to weaken. What's an investor supposed to do now?