big banks

The Bizarro World of Investment Advice

Do you ignore Warren Buffett, banks' greed and peer-reviewed research? Do you rely on advisers only as good as a coin flip? Welcome to Bizarro World.

Fed Asks JPMorgan and Goldman for New Capital Plans

JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs were told by the Federal Reserve to submit new capital plans by the end of September. The Fed will then decide if they are in compliance with the rules on capital reserves.

FDIC: Banks Earn $141.3 Billion in 2012, Second-Highest Annual Haul Ever

Profits at U.S. banks jumped almost 37 percent for the October-December period, reaching the highest level for a fourth quarter in six years as banks continued to step up lending. The figures are fresh evidence of the industry's sustained recovery more than four years after the financial crisis.

Without Taxpayer Aid, Too Big to Fail Banks Would Only Break Even

Today brings what seems like a minor milestone in the big banks' fall from grace: a Bloomberg editorial announcing that Wall Street's largest firms would not be profitable without taxpayer backstops, and calling for an end to the perverse incentives that this arrangement produces.

Sandy Gives Big Banks Some Humanity

The worst recession in decades wasn't enough to make big banks relent in their pursuit of income, but Hurricane Sandy apparently gave them pause: Several banks have stepped up to make things easier for their customers during their current time of need.

FDIC: Bank Earnings Hit Five-Year High in 2011

A surge in earnings by the biggest banks at the end of last year made 2011 the most profitable time for the industry in five years. More earnings and fewer troubled banks suggest the industry has healed since the 2008 financial crisis.

States, Feds to Announce Mortgage Settlement

U.S. states have reached a $25 billion deal with the nation's biggest mortgage lenders over foreclosure abuses that occurred after the housing bubble burst. Federal and state officials announced the deal Thursday. It is the biggest settlement involving a single industry since a 1998 multistate tobacco deal.

Beyond Card Fees: Banks Look To Sell Your Data

New and higher debit card fees may not be enough to satiate the big banks. Financial institutions looking for more revenue are now eyeing another potential source of money: Selling your debit-card transaction data to marketers. So which is worth more to you: The deals such targeted advertising will bring, or your privacy?

Why Credit Unions Are Better Choice Than Big Banks

Millions of Americans are disgusted with the big bank status quo, and many are closing out their accounts and moving their money to smaller institutions. It's a good time to do it: Credit unions are waiting with open arms, a customer-centric philosophy -- and incentives.

The Tricky Logistics of Occupying Wall Street

Three weeks after it began, Occupy Wall Street is getting its second wind, with a wave of celebrity support, and linked protests popping up in other cities. But camping out in Manhattan is getting logistically ever more complex: How long can Occupy Wall Street continue to actually occupy Wall Street?

Short Sellers See a Rebound Coming for Big Bank Stocks

Investors have generally taken a negative position on big banks lately: Major financial institutions face a host of issues that are punishing their bottom lines. However, some of Wall Street's most carefully watched investors -- short sellers -- are withdrawing their bets against them.

Trust in Banks Falls Back to Financial Crisis Lows

Americans' overall trust in the nation's financial system has dropped from 26% to 20%, a level that matches the lows recorded during the heart of the financial crisis in late 2008, according to the latest results from the Chicago Booth/Kellogg School Financial Trust Index.

Don't Ask, Just Cram: Let Judges Modify Mortgages Again

Regulators want the nation's big banks to reduce what borrowers owe on underwater mortgages, but they're still focused on solutions that rely on banks to voluntarily do the right thing. But we've already seen that won't work, and history shows what will -- giving bankruptcy judges back the right to cram down mortgages.