benefits

The Job Benefit We Covet Most Is?

What motivates American workers to get to their jobs? Glassdoor knows: Its latest survey reveals which benefits are most important to us. No shock, health insurance is No. 1.

What to Do When Your Boss Stiffs Your 401(k)

Wondering why you haven't seen the performance you've hoped for from your 401(k) lately? A big reason may be that your employer isn't putting what it used to into the account.

Here's How Washington Is Likely to Trim Our Social Security Benefits

When Congress and President Obama make a budget deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, they're likely to use something called "chained CPI" to tweak how Social Security calculates cost of living adjustments. Here's a plain English explanation of what that means, and how it will effect your retirement.

How to Get Your Ex to Help Fund Your Retirement

If you're divorced, your ex-husband or ex-wife might still be able to help you feather your nest in retirement. And there's at least one former-spouse benefit you won't need to go to court to get access to: payments based on their Social Security earnings record.

How to Get Warren Buffett- Style Shareholder Perks

For investors who open a brokerage account and buy stocks, there's more to be had than just the promise of better investment returns. Some of America's best-known firms also offer perks to their shareholders -- and not just big-money shareholders, either.

4 Ways to Get the Most From Social Security

Most people's big worry about Social Security these days is that it won't be there at all when they retire. But what they should be worrying about is how to boost their benefits down the road. Here are four ways to do that:

How to Save on Health Insurance, Part 2: Individual Plans

With the unemployment rate at almost 10% and companies cutting back on benefits, millions of people are responsible for securing their own health insurance. Picking the right plan for you can be tricky, so DailyFinance asked consumer health experts for tips on how to maximize benefits while minimizing costs.

My Three Cents: How Much Are You Looking to Earn?

It seems like a trick question when the job interviewer asks: "How much are you looking to make?" In today's tough job market, your instinct might be to answer, "I'll take anything." But the smarter move is to do some research so you can walk into salary talks with a sense for your market value.

Employers Win Workers
With Perks, Not Raises

To retain top employees and attract new ones, U.S. companies are increasingly turning to perks such as subsidized training and flexible work conditions rather than raises. These incentives are finding a welcome among employees, too, especially educational benefits.

State Worker Retirements Are Soaring Across the Country

As wages and benefits shrink, state workers are retiring in droves. On top of all the layoffs, these retirements amount to a huge brain drain of government employees, and the problem is likely to get worse given the yawning budget gaps of states from coast to coast.

State Governments Are Just Adding to Labor's Woes

American labor unions have been in decline for a half-century now -- and, currently, virtually the only large unions still growing are those in the public sector. Until now. Cash-strapped states are attacking unions where it hurts by trying to strip them of the right to collectively bargain.

The Employment Cost Index Deserves a Closer Look

The employment cost index increased just 2% in 2010, and the trend will likely continue in 2011. Those contained employee costs will help maintain a low-inflation environment that should give the Fed more time to stimulate the economy through its asset-purchase program.

Walmart to Stop Paying Employees Extra for Sundays

As part of its efforts to reduce its labor costs, Walmart plans to stop paying its staff an extra $1 an hour for working Sundays starting in 2011, according to Bloomberg. The move won't affect the retailer's 1.4 million current U.S. employees, only those hired after Jan. 1.