banking regulation

Bank Fees: What's the Breaking Point for Customers?

Bank of America learned pretty quickly last month that customers think $5 a month is too much to pay to use a debit card. But is there such a thing as a reasonable bank fee? One in three people say they're prepared to walk away from their financial institution to avoid a fee, a new survey reveals.

Investors Extend Talks With Bank of America Over Mortgage Bonds

Bank of America (BAC) said talks will continue with bondholders who are demanding it buy back securities backed by billions of dollars of bad mortgages. Bank of America has been in talks with investors including Pacific Investment Management Co (Pimco), BlackRock Inc (BLK) and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York over $47 billion of mortgage bonds, Bloomberg News reported.

Bank of America Considers Tiered Fee Structure

Bank of America (BAC) may introduce a tiered fee structure modeled on mobile phone service contracts. Under the proposed scheme, the bank would reward customers who maintain minimum current account balances, use their credit card a certain number of times each month, or do all their banking online, The Financial Times reported. Customers who don%u2019t do these things would be charged more.

Two Years After Lehman:
Still Too Big to Fail

"It felt like the world was on fire," recalls financial writer Andrew Ross Sorkin, whose book Too Big To Fail covers the crisis at its peak. In an interview, he discusses the meltdown, its aftermath, the quest for power on Wall Street and why more regulation is still needed.

Fuld: Regulators Had 'Flawed Information' in Lehman Bankruptcy

U.S. regulators used "flawed information" when they decided not to extend the kind of aid to Lehman Brothers that later went to other financial institutions, the bank%u2019s former CEO Richard Fuld says. Lehman filed for the nation%u2019s largest-ever bankruptcy in September 2008, a move that sparked panic in the financial markets.

U.S.-European Discord Could Hurt G-20 Reforms

Obama wants European governments to keep spending to stave off an economic slowdown. Europe, particularly Germany, doesn't want to hear about it. Expect a fractious debate at the Toronto summit meeting of G-20 industrial countries.

As Some Banking Fees Fall, Others Will Rise

As new laws clamp down on some credit card and account fees, banks are likely to find other ways to offset the lost income. Among the possibilities: Hefty increases in annual credit card fees or an end to free checking.

The Financial Reform Endgame Approaches

One of the key questions facing Congress as it labors to reconcile the House and Senate bills is this: Three years after the financial crisis began, how much risk should America's banks be allowed to take? Not surprisingly, opinions differ greatly.

How to Prevent Another Financial Crisis? Make Wall Street Pay

What's needed is an approach that shifts incentives so that bankers can effectively regulate themselves. They should get paid based on a share of their customers' long-term investment returns, and they wouldn't get bonuses if their banks violated capital requirements.

Costly Cash: The Feds Won't Protect You From Payday Loans

In the wake of the mortgage loan mess and financial crisis, Congress was hot to regulate this business. But the federal-level effort has lost steam, partly because lawmakers seem to have come around to the industry's point of view rather than the consumer's.