bank stress tests

Is Goldman Sachs Riskier Than It Wants to Admit?

The Federal Reserve will release the final results of its bank stress tests after Thursday's market close. But preliminary results suggest Goldman could lose $25 billion from bad trades in another financial crisis, more than any other bank tested by the Fed.

Vikram Pandit Quits as Citigroup CEO

Vikram Pandit abruptly stepped down as CEO of Citigroup on Tuesday after steering the bank through the 2008 financial crisis and the choppy years that followed. Also resigning: President and Chief Operating Officer John Havens. Citigroup offered no explanation for the sudden departures.

Is Another Banking Crisis Staring America in the Face?

Recent stress tests on America's big banks reveal that the financial crisis is far from over. While the "too big to fails" are in better shape than they were in 2008, there's still "room for improvement at virtually every firm."

Fed to Test Six Big Banks for Euro Stress

The Federal Reserve plans to stress test six large U.S. banks against a hypothetical market shock, including a deterioration of the European debt crisis, as part of an annual review of bank health. The Fed said it will publish next year the results of the tests for six banks that have large trading operations: Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo.

Why Is the Fed Letting Big Banks Boost Dividends?

The Fed's decision to allow big banks to pay sharply higher dividends makes no sense, and not just because the results of the so-called "stress tests" are secret. Based on facts that are public knowledge, the banks are actually insolvent, and in danger of sinking much further.

For Big Banks, Dividends
Set to Make a Comeback

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon is the latest bank exec to raise this enticing prospect, just in time for banks to start releasing earnings. Overall, Wall Street is expecting the big banks to post strong results, including improved credit quality and increased capital.

The New Bank Stress Tests Show Just How Serious the Mortgage Mess Is

This week, the Congressional Oversight Panel recommended that the nation's big banks be stress tested again, because if problems with mortgage-backed securities are widespread, the consequences could be dire. Now, the Fed has agreed to run those tests, which it wouldn't do if it wasn't worried.

Real Signs of Confidence in Europe's Economy

Although Wall Street anxiously awaited the results of bank stress tests in Europe, the real news is elsewhere: the improving economic conditions across Europe. Can the U.S. learn a lesson from Germany and France?

Were the European Bank Stress Tests Too Easy?

Banking regulators tested the soundness of 91 European banks this week to see if they could withstand a financial crisis, and only seven failed to pass muster. But some analysts say the tests may have been too easy, and wonder what would happen if a real "worst-case scenario" hit.