bank bailout

Behind Cyprus' Plan to Seize Bank Deposits

A plan to seize up to 10 percent of Cypriot's savings has been met with fury and raised concern, if not panic, in the rest of Europe about the security of bank deposits.

Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Managers' Median Pay: $200,000 a Year

A government report finds median pay for nearly 2,000 senior managers at government-controlled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac exceeded $200,000 last year. The Federal Housing Finance Agency, which oversees the two mortgage giants, also did an inadequate job monitoring pay, according to the report.

Shadow Banking: The $67 Trillion Threat to the U.S. Economy

Shadow banking. The name alone sounds ominous -- and it should. Operating out of the spotlight of regulation, the shadow banking system could, given the right conditions, leap from its dark, financial hiding place and bring the U.S. economy to its knees, just like it nearly did in 2008.

Pop Quiz: What Did Washington's Bailout Bonanza Buy for America?

The government's Great Recession bailouts are one of the hot topics of debate this election. But let's skip the rhetoric and run the numbers. If you think you know the facts about the bailouts, or if you're just curious, take a peek at our bailout quiz.

Credit Default Swaps: Still Here, Still Able to Wreak Havoc

JPMorgan Chase's rapid $2 billion trading loss reportedly involved credit default swaps -- the same investments that played such a large role in the financial crisis. Here's why credit default swaps still pose such a threat to the U.S. economy.

Why All of Us Might Pay for BoA's $5 Fee

Last week, Bank of America ignited a firestorm of controversy by choosing to charge its customers $5 a month to use their debit cards. Now, an angry consumer group has called for a federal investigation. Is this overkill or a smart response to what could be a budding disaster for the bank -- and taxpayers?

What's Really Wrong With Letting Banks Pay Big Dividends

The Federal Reserve is finally admitting that not all the big banks are healthy: Bank of America won't get to pay increased dividends. But none of those financial giants should be allowed to, and a logical look at the reasons they say they want to dole out the cash makes it totally clear why.

Bank Bailouts Cost Much Less Than the FDIC Expected

Given the level of public outrage over the government's rescue of banks during the financial crisis, the final cost to the taxpayer of keeping those failed institutions afloat turns out to have been relatively modest: The FDIC has paid out a mere $8.89 billion to 165 banks since the crisis began.

Why Wall Street Paychecks Dwarf Those of Most Americans

Why is that so -- when the average worker hasn't enjoyed even a small raise? That's because Wall Street enjoys at least four major advantages that other industries can only dream about, including an implied backstop against losses by the federal government.

The Mortgage Mess: Blame Banks, Not Homeowners

After an exhaustive examination, DailyFinance's legal reporter comes to a clear verdict: Banks are responsible for 90% of the problem, homeowners 10%. Banks have done three things to create the massive glut of foreclosures choking America's legal systems and laying waste to its real estate markets.

Getting to Zero: How Congress Could Balance the Federal Budget

It took about 10 years of decisions for the federal budget to get more than a trillion dollars out of whack, and it's going to take at least five years to balance it again. The only way to do it is piece-by-piece, with equal sacrifices from both Republicans and Democrats.

Ireland's Credit Rating Downgraded 3 Notches by Fitch

Fitch Ratings has downgraded Ireland three notches from A to BBB , citing the costs of restructuring the Irish banking system, the country's weak growth prospects, and uncertainty about its economy due to the deepening financial crisis, despite the international economic assistance it received last month.

Bank of America Says It's Ready to Exit TARP

Bank of America has told U.S. regulators that it has met the final condition that was set on its plan to exit the government's Troubled Asset Relief Program. BofA, which repaid $45 billion in TARP funds in December 2009, needed to raise $3 billion in capital by the end of 2010.

Citigroup Earnings Beat Wall Street Estimates

Citigroup on Monday morning reported third quarter net income of $2.2 billion, topping Wall Street estimates and marking its third consecutive quarterly operating profit. Citi shares were up as much as 2.3% in premarket trading.

2010 U.S. Budget Deficit Comes in Below Expectations

Investors received another sign Friday that the U.S. economy is continuing to heal: The 2010 U.S. budget deficit came in at a smaller-than-predicted $1.29 trillion. Though it was still the second-highest deficit on record, the numbers reflect growth in tax revenues, and thus in the economy.

Obama's Bank Bailout Chief Is
the Latest to Go

Herbert Allison, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Stability, is the latest member of the Obama economic to leave ahead of what many expect to be crushing losses for the Democrats in November.

Overhaul May Transform Mortgage Giants Fannie and Freddie

Mortgage finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac may not even exist in their current forms after a revamp of the U.S. housing finance system, Assistant Treasury Secretary Michael Barr said on Tuesday. Moreover, "private gains will no longer be subsidized by public losses," he said.

Two Years After Lehman:
Still Too Big to Fail

"It felt like the world was on fire," recalls financial writer Andrew Ross Sorkin, whose book Too Big To Fail covers the crisis at its peak. In an interview, he discusses the meltdown, its aftermath, the quest for power on Wall Street and why more regulation is still needed.

Goldman Makes Another Great Deal -- for Goldman

The $550 million SEC settlement is just 8.9% of the $6.2 billion increase in Goldman's market value on the day the deal was announced. And it's an even smaller portion of the cash, backdoor, taxpayer-funded bailout Goldman was handed in 2008.

Goldman May Be Financial Reform's Biggest Loser

Some winners and losers of the Dodd-Frank financial regulation reform bill are beginning to emerge. The bill's limits on proprietary trading will potentially hit Goldman Sachs the hardest. But it could also take a long time before those losses are realized.

House Passes Wall Street Reform Bill, Senate Holds Off

Nearly two years after the nation's banking system imploded, the House Democrats passed a financial regulatory reform bill intended to avoid the calamity's recurrence. The Senate delayed action on the bill as Dems try to muster the needed votes.