Whistleblower

IRS Pays Whistleblower $104 Million

The Internal Revenue Service has awarded an ex-banker $104 million for providing information about overseas tax cheats -- the largest amount ever awarded by the agency, lawyers for the whistleblower announced Tuesday.

Blowing the Whistle Can Net You Big Bucks

If you have proof of financial crime -- corporate malfeasance or tax evasion, say -- you shouldn't keep it to yourself: Rewards for whistleblowers can reach as high as 15 to 30 percent of the money recovered by the government. Read on for some recent examples of richly rewarded whistleblowing, as well as tips for anyone thinking of blowing the whistle.

Bank of America Document Leaks Allege Insurance Scams

A former seven-year Bank of America employee alleges in a series of leaked documents that a Bank of America subsidiary, Balboa Insurance, engaged in scams involving insurance policies known as force-placed insurance.

More Proof That Whistleblowing on Medicaid Fraud Works

Whistleblowing firm Ven-A-Care has recovered $2 billion for taxpayers by suing drug companies that overcharge the government and create windfalls for participating pharmacies. It also has made $380 million for itself. What's the problem with that?

A Whistleblower Blasts Chase Credit Card Practices

Linda Almonte, a former employee of JPMorgan Chase who is suing the bank for wrongful termination, has just upped the ante by filing a whistle-blower complaint with the SEC. The core allegations charge Chase with grotesque and illegal practices involving its credit card debt processes.

How many whistleblowers does it take?

It seems that Harry Markopolos wasn't the only person blowing the whistle on the Ponzi scheme being run by money manager Bernard Madoff. News is now...