United States Department of the Treasury

President Obama's Weirdest New Taxes

To achieve $1.8 trillion in new revenue, President Obama has plenty of big taxes in his budget proposal. Here are some quirky maneuvers he suggests.

Quiz: How Financially Literate Are You?

From taxes and credit to saving and money management, you can get lost in the complexity of financial issues. How well do you know the basics of personal finance?

Post-Financial Crisis, the SEC Is More Toothless Than Ever

Whether you have millions of dollars invested in stocks, or a few thousand bucks in mutual funds, it's vitally important to you that the SEC -- Wall Street's top cop -- is doing its duty, and enforcing the law. But a new report casts doubt on whether our financial cop is really on the beat.

Treasury Has Sold Its Last Shares of AIG (and Turned a Profit, Too)

The Treasury Department said Tuesday that it has sold all its remaining shares of AIG, wrapping up the government's biggest bailout of the financial crisis. With this sale, the government has received $22.7 billion more than the $182 billion in support it provided to AIG during the crisis.

HSBC to Pay $1.9 Billion to Settle Money-Laundering Case

HSBC agreed Tuesday to pay $1.9 billion to settle a U.S. money-laundering probe. Europe's largest bank will pay the biggest penalty ever imposed on a bank after facing accusations it transferred funds through the U.S. from Mexican drug cartels and on behalf of nations such as Iran that are under international sanctions.

Surprise: New Insurance Fee in Health Care Reform Law

Your medical plan is facing an unexpected expense, so you probably are, too: It's a new, $63-per-head fee to cushion the cost of covering people with pre-existing conditions under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul.

Dear President Obama: Sell the Government's GM Stake Now

Dear Mr. President: I know you're proud of the effort made by your team back in 2009 to save General Motors. You should be. But as good as this GM thing has been for you, with the election now over, it's time to let go and direct the Treasury to sell its stake in General Motors.

Uncle Sam's GM Investment Is Still Coming Up Short

The Treasury says it expects to lose more than $25 billion on its bailout of the auto industry -- mostly on its GM investment. But we've also been told GM paid back the Feds. How does this add up, and what has to happen for taxpayers to get their money back?

Senate Set for Symbolic Showdown on Tax Cuts

The Senate is bracing for a tax-cut showdown that is all about Democrats and Republicans showing voters their differences over taxing the well-off while accusing each other of threatening to shove the government over a fiscal cliff.

Many Fortune 500 Firms Pay Less in Income Taxes Than You

It's widely known that millionaires and billionaires pay taxes at a lower rate than those of us who make much less. But did you know that Americans collectively pay far higher income tax rates than many U.S. companies with billions of dollars in profits?

Government Motors: Why Won't D.C. Sell Its GM Stock?

Thanks to TARP loans that saved GM, the Treasury ended up with a major stake in the world's largest automaker, and it still holds 500 million shares -- 32% of the company. Here's the reason it won't be selling them any time soon.

A 'Safe' Way to Lose Money: Why Not to Buy Bonds Now

About a month ago, the Germany government sold $5 billion worth of Eurobonds that paid an average interest rate of -- get this -- negative 0.0122%. That's right: These bonds are guaranteed to lose value. So why did they sell? In a word, it's all about risk.

Elected Insiders: Why the STOCK Act Matters to You

Four times in five years, lawmakers have introduced the Stop Trading On Congressional Knowledge Act to bar senators and representatives from investing based on knowledge they gained in the course of their duties. Three times, the STOCK Act has died in committee. Will the fourth time be the charm?

Harvard Endowment Has an Excellent Year

F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote: "Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me." He was right: The rich get better returns on investment. The Harvard endowment rose 21.4% to $32 billion in the university's fiscal year, which ended on June 30.