UnintendedAcceleration

Toyota Accelerates Toward a Market Share Recovery

Toyota will announce Friday that by September, it expects to have all of its North American plants back to their normal production levels. Then, it can begin attempting to recoup the U.S. market share it lost due to shortages related to the Japan earthquake and tsunami, as well as a slew of recalls.

The Government Reports Aren't an All-Clear for Toyota

The carmaker hoped findings from two federal studies would put to rest speculation about its electronics system as a source for unintended acceleration. But the results may not prove enough to give Toyota a leg up in its ongoing legal battles.

Electronics Didn't Cause Toyota Sudden Acceleration

In an affirmation of Toyota's claims, an exhaustive 10-month federal investigation has found no evidence of an electronic source for sudden unintended acceleration in companpy's vehicles. Indeed, human error was cited as the cause in many cases.

Toyota Keeps Slim Lead Over GM Despite Recall Woes

Toyota managed to hold onto the title of world's No. 1 automaker last year, despite numerous safety recalls that took a toll on its sales. Toyota sold 8.42 million vehicles worldwide in 2010, enough to barely edge out resurgent General Motors, which rang up sales of 8.39 million.

Toyota Revives Miss. Plant, Will Boost U.S. Production

Toyota plans to rev up its vehicle production in the U.S., despite November's 7.3% drop in U.S. sales. The automaker has hired the first of an expected 2,000 workers for a new Mississippi Corolla plant, and says it expects to boost overall capacity utilization significantly from last year's weak levels.

Toyota's Latest Recall: 94,000 Sienna Minivans

The beleaguered Japanese carmaker is sending notices to Sienna owners to warn them of brake-light switch brackets that are susceptible to damage and could lead to eventual loss of braking effectiveness. No accidents relating to the defect have been reported.

Honda May Be Investigated for 2005 Accord Hybrid Accident

Honda Motor may be the subject of a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration investigation because of possible acceleration problems with its Honda Accord Hybrid that may have caused a 2005 crash that killed one person.

Toyota Asks Court to Toss Unintended Acceleration Lawsuits

Toyota is asking a federal court in California to dismiss lawsuits claiming that electronics -- not floor mats or sticky gas pedals -- are the cause of unintended acceleration in its vehicles, saying plaintiffs have not proved there's a design defect in the vehicles' electronic systems.

Toyota Wants Lawsuits Thrown Out

=Toyota has asked a federal court to dismiss lawsuits seeking damages related to the recall of millions of vehicles for possible unintended acceleration. The automaker has a simple argument: No one has ever demonstrated what is wrong with Toyota's cars, if anything.

Toyota Denies New Unintended Acceleration Claims

Toyota Motor is once again defending itself against claims that it sought to cover up vehicle defects after it reportedly bought back cars that accelerated unintentionally but failed to disclose the problem to federal safety officials.

Shareholders Sue Toyota Over Recall- Induced Stock Slide

Toyota may have repaired most of the cars it recalled for unintended acceleration problems, but it hasn't repaired its stock price, and U.S. shareholders have filed a class-action lawsuit against the automaker for failing to disclose what it knew about the defects.

Toyota: Unintended Acceleration Claims Are Down 80%

Toyota says complaints by its cars' unintended acceleration have dropped 80% compared to April, , as the world's largest automaker continues to make strides in repairing the nearly 8 million vehicles recalled in the U.S. to over sticky gas pedals and accelerators that get hung up on floor mats.

Toyota Wants 'Unintended Acceleration' Lawsuits Tossed

Toyota has asked a federal judge to dismiss hundreds of lawsuits over problems with unintended acceleration in its vehicles. The world's largest automaker says such complaints are based on anecdotes, and fail to identify specific defects, Bloomberg News reported.

Fewer New Car Buyers Are Switching to Toyota

After a series of recalls, Toyota is attracting fewer car owners who drive other brands, despite generous incentives and a massive media campaign to address concerns about quality. Nearly half of all new cars sold at Toyota dealerships this year included a Toyota trade-in, up from 42% in 2009.

Toyota Hits the Brakes on New Car Development

Acknowledging that "fast growth of the past decade has been too much in some areas for the company to keep up with," a Toyota VP says the carmaker will extend product development by four weeks and add 1,000 engineers to quality control.

Congress Accuses Toyota of Holding Back Information

Congress continues to press Toyota about what it knew when regarding unintended acceleration problems in its vehicles. Lawmakers are now seeking more information about the brake override feature that the automaker has begun installing on new cars and trucks to prevent the malfunctions.

Prius Driver Error Caused Crash, Police Say

Driver error, and not a stuck gas pedal, caused a 2005 Toyota Prius hybrid sedan to strike a stone wall in suburban New York this month, local investigators said Monday. Information gathered from the vehicle's "black box" led police to the conclusion.

Toyota: Runaway Prius' Accelerator Works Properly

Toyota says James Sikes' story of unintended acceleration on a San Diego freeway last week is 'inconsistent' with its preliminary analysis, which found the accelerator pedal operates normally. An NHTSA attempt to replicate the incident was also unsuccessful.

Toyota Disputes Claims of Electronics Failures

Toyota went on the offensive Monday, taking to task outside tests performed by a Southern Illinois University professor showing its electronic throttle-control system was susceptible to glitches that could lead to sudden and dramatic acceleration in Toyota vehicles.

LaHood Makes Things Even Worse for Toyota

Though the Transportation chief quickly backed down from his initial advice that owners of recalled cars "stop driving" them, Toyota can only chalk this up as one more disaster. Still, it's scrambling to get cars fixed and will have plenty of explaining to do when it reports earnings this week.

Toyota Announces Its Gas-Pedal Plan

Toyota said Monday that it has begun shipping parts to its dealers to fix 2.3 million recalled cars with "sticky" accelerators and that it will begin sending letters to owners of the affected vehicles later this week. Many dealers will stay open extended hours, some around the clock, to repair the cars.

Toyota Dealers Have That Lonely, Sinking Feeling

The recalls could cost the company tens of millions of dollars, but what about it dealers? Some estimates put their loss as high as $2.5 billion a month. That's a lotta Tundras-full of cash. If the recall and production shutdown drag on for months, it's possible that some dealers may have to close.