U.S. Bank

Credit Card Horror Tales: 5 Ways Bad Plastic Kills Your Finances

The credit card market remains plagued by cards built to kill your savings, despite the consumer-friendly reforms of the CARD Act and record-low interest rates for most loans. Here are the five most common ways the worst credit cards prey on unsuspecting consumers.

AmEx: Still America's Favorite Credit Card

American Express remains the most beloved credit card issuer in the country. For the sixth year in a row, the card issuer has taken first place for customer satisfaction, according to a survey of nearly 14,000 credit card customers conducted by J.D. Power and Associates.

Less Need Now to Read Your Credit Card's Fine Print

It appears that complaints from consumers and regulators about the lack of credit card transparency at banks have not fallen on deaf ears. According to CardHub.com's 2011 Credit Card Application Study, the 10 biggest issuers of plastic have significantly improved transparency this year.

California's SolarCity Sees a Bright Market on the East Coast

California-based solar panel installer SolarCity has announced its second East Coast deal in a month: It's buying the residential solar business of Vermont-based groSolar, hard on the heels of its purchase of Maryland's Clean Currents. And SolarCity isn't the only West Coast solar player looking toward the sunrise for growth.

Court Gives Hope to Homeowners Lied to by Banks

A California appeals court has ruled that U.S. Bank conned Claudia Aceves out of her home by tricking her into giving up her bankruptcy protections. Now she can sue the bank for damages and fraud, and conceivably, so could other homeowners in similar situations.

U.S. Bancorp to Buy Bank of America's Trust Division

U.S. Bancorp agreed to pay as much as $35 million in cash for Bank of America's securitization trust administration units in the U.S. and Europe. The deal is part of the U.S. Bank parent company's efforts to expands its corporate trust business.

Robo-Signing: California Dems Call for Federal Probe

The state's entire House Democratic delegation has asked the Justice Department, the Fed and Controller of the Currency to investigate the widespread -- and growing -- problem of banks presenting faulty documents in foreclosure cases.