Transparency

Apple CEO Tim Cook: We'll Make Macs in America

Apple CEO Tim Cook opened up to Bloomberg Businessweek about some of the hot button issues facing his company. The man who succeeded Steve Jobs dishes on Maps, executive changes, overall management style, and making Macs in the U.S.A.

5 Companies Americans Can Be Proud Of

Called it conscious capitalism or just good business, but these five companies have all prospered in every measure over the last decade by doing good for their employees, suppliers, customers or the general public.

What You Don't Know About 401(k) Fees Can Cost You

The fees hidden in 401(k)s aren't standard, which means you could be paying more than your friends, family or coworkers. But what%u2019s scary is that most Americans don%u2019t even know money is being sucked out of their 401(k) -- and that%u2019s just the way most plan providers want it.

Less Need Now to Read Your Credit Card's Fine Print

It appears that complaints from consumers and regulators about the lack of credit card transparency at banks have not fallen on deaf ears. According to CardHub.com's 2011 Credit Card Application Study, the 10 biggest issuers of plastic have significantly improved transparency this year.

Denied Credit? New Fed Rule May Interest You

Have you ever been turned down for a loan? Had your credit line slashed or interest rate bumped up? Well, starting Thursday, banks and other lenders will be required tell you a bit more about why. The FTC and the Fed are implementing a new rule requiring lenders to show consumers the credit score data they used to make their decision.

Wikinvest's Mike Sha on the Investing Wisdom of Crowds

If the financial collapse taught us anything, it's that opacity and self-serving behavior rule at the big Wall Street firms -- so how can the little guy trust their advice? Wikinvest's Mike Sha explains how crowdsourcing can provide better, less biased investment advice to average investors.

SEC to Vote on 'Naked Access' Ban

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is considering a rule that would level the playing field between retail investors and high frequency traders. Under the proposed rule, unlicensed high-frequency traders will no longer be able to gain "naked access" to public markets through brokerages that rent out their access.