TraditionalIra

How to Sneak Into a Roth IRA Through the 'Back Door'

The Roth IRA is one of the best retirement vehicles around, thanks primarily to its terrific tax advantages. The only problem is that some people earn too much, and aren't qualified to contribute directly to one. Fortunately, there's a way around those restrictions.

You Know What's Overrated? Retirement

There are several major flaws in the classic "retirement as a goal" scenario, but you're not locked into it. If you've avoided major debt and have an education that allows you the freedom to re-imagine the concept, you could completely change your life.

12 Money-Saving Year-End Tax Tips You Shouldn't Miss

Although the end of 2011 is near, it's not too late to make sure you don't owe more to the IRS than you need to on April 15. Here are some tax-smart moves to make before you head out to that New Year's Eve party.

How the Taxes Work on a Roth IRA Conversion

When you contribute to a traditional IRA, you can deduct that money from your taxable income that year. When you contribute to a Roth IRA, you don't get the immediate tax benefit -- but you withdraw your money tax-free in retirement. It's also possible to convert from a traditional to a Roth, but you have to pay taxes to do so. A reader named Ron wants to know how that works, and when he'd have to pay the taxes. DailyFinance's Laura Rowley explains.

What Everyone Ought to Know About Roth IRAs

Though it has been part of the retirement investing landscape for more than a decade, many people still don't understand the Roth IRA, or what it can do for them. DailyFinance's Sheryl Nance-Nash clears up the myths and misunderstandings about this tax-advantaged savings vehicle.