Toyota recall

Toyota's Got Bigger Problems Than the Recall

On top of Toyota's large-scale recall involving a potential fire hazard, the company is suffering from steep declines in one of its most important markets because of a political dispute. But things may not be as grim as they seem for the carmaker.

Can Toyota Catch Up to Detroit?

Somebody forgot to tell the automakers that the economy is going downhill: Auto sales in September were up 10% over last year's numbers, with all of Detroit's Big Three posting solid gains. Imports, however, did not fare as well. Can Toyota, once unstoppable, win back its former primacy, post-tsunami and accelerator debacle?

Is GM's Rebound the Real Deal?

Detroit's revival is nearly complete: Chrysler recently made its first profit in five years, Ford has posted its best results since 1998, and GM is poised to retake the crown as the world's biggest automaker. But to hold onto that position, GM will have to adjust to a rapidly shifting auto market.

Toyota Issues Recall Over Faulty Tire Pressure Monitors

Toyota is recalling another 22,000 trucks and sport-utility vehicles, this time so that it can repair faulty tire pressure monitoring systems. Vehicles affected by the recall include the Toyota FJ Cruiser, Land Cruiser, Sequoia, Tacoma and Tundra from the 2008 through 2011 model years.

Lexus Recall Drags Toyota and the Nikkei Lower

Shares were mixed in Asia Wednesday. In Japan the Nikkei 225 Index sank 0.6% as Toyota announced yet another vehicle recall. In China, however, the Shanghai Composite Index gained 1.2% and Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index inched up 0.2%.

No Longer the 'Big Three,' but They've Stopped Shrinking

With U.S. automotive dominance waning, a new moniker has emerged: the "Detroit Three." But don't count out Ford, GM or Chrysler -- their post-recession future looks strong, thanks to some agonizing restructuring. Now, they can be profitable selling fewer cars.

Toyota Revives Miss. Plant, Will Boost U.S. Production

Toyota plans to rev up its vehicle production in the U.S., despite November's 7.3% drop in U.S. sales. The automaker has hired the first of an expected 2,000 workers for a new Mississippi Corolla plant, and says it expects to boost overall capacity utilization significantly from last year's weak levels.