Time Warner Cable

Market Minute: Time Warner Cable Wins Dodgers TV Deal

Time Warner Cable has won a contract to carry Los Angeles Dodgers games for at least the next two decades starting in 2014, snatching the games away from Fox Sports after this year's baseball season ends, according to a person familiar with the matter.

7 Business Battles That Bruised Consumers in 2012

Companies get into fights all the time: in the courts, through their advertising, in contract negotiations with partners, and even with their own workers. To some extent, it's just business as usual -- but when those fights escalate, it's often consumers who feel the pain.

Still Hate Your TV Company? You're Not Alone

As cable companies and satellite TV providers made their latest quarterly reports, one thing became clear: Americans are fed up with their bills for premium TV. The cable and satellite TV industries ended the period with 292,000 fewer customers than they started with.

Linsanity Trips Time Warner Cable: Can it Rebound?

There is no shortage of winners when it comes to the surprising ascent of basketball star Jeremy Lin: the Knicks; Madison Square Garden Inc.; the fans; the NBA; Linsanity T-shirt sellers. But the loser has been Time Warner Cable, and its losing streak could last awhile.

Disney and Comcast Reach a Long-Term Deal

The Walt Disney Co. said Wednesday that it reached a long-term agreement with the nation's largest TV signal provider, Comcast Corp., that extends their partnership into the next decade. The deal covers major pay channels ESPN, Disney Channel and ABC Family and the retransmission of free ABC broadcast network programs through seven ABC TV stations. It allows Comcast subscribers to gain greater access to shows on demand over the Internet on multiple devices.

U.S. Workers Lost $38 Billion in Wages Waiting for the Cable Guy Last Year

Waiting for the cable guy, the Internet guy, or the air conditioner guy are tedious life necessities, like doing laundry or visiting the in-laws. But they are vastly more expensive. According to a new poll, American workers lost a total of $37.7 billion waiting around for in-house appointments in 2011.

Should Netflix Be Afraid of YouTube's Movie Rentals?

Google's video-sharing site, YouTube, is giving Netflix investors a little scare with its recent announcement that it has doubled the number of movie titles in its rental library to 6,000. But could YouTube's strategy be successful enough that it could directly compete with Netflix?

What If AT&T's T-Mobile Buyout Gets Shot Down?

Regulators have begun to take a long, hard look at whether the AT&T buyout of T-Mobile would create a quasi-monopoly in the American cellular carrier industry. If those antitrust concerns sink the deal, AT&T could be in real trouble, because cellular is its only clear hope for growth.

Can Al Jazeera Capitalize on Its Newfound Popularity?

The Qatar-based network is getting international kudos for its coverage of the growing Middle East crisis. But acclaim and a growing audience don't yet equal profits and market share for Al Jazeera, which has almost certainly been losing money since its launch in 1996.

The News Biz Glimpses a Cable-TV Model in the Booming iPad News Apps

Apple has just annointed Flipboard, an innovative news aggregation app, as its App of the Year. It's just one of several such apps that sort of mimic how cable companies operate as bundlers of content. And therein lies the promise of a mass, ad-supported business model.

Cox Communications Launches Cell Network

Cox Communications is taking on wireless companies on its own turf by launching a long-anticipated cellular service in three scattered markets where it already provides cable.

Is the Web Dead? No.
But It's at Risk

Wired magazine has just declared the demise of the wild, open web, eclipsed by discrete apps and walled gardens -- all controlled by powerful corporations like Apple. Here's how this dire vision dovetails with the Google-Verizon net neutrality deal.