T-Bills

How to Handle the Bond-Market Collapse

Most investors think stocks are riskier than bonds. Recently, that script has flipped. Here's what to do about the surprising losses from the "safe" portion of your portfolio.

How Risky Are Your Bonds? Here's How to Tell

Interest rates have to start rising again soon, and while higher rates are generally good for people looking to put new money to work in the bond market, those who already own bonds could take a bath on their supposedly "safe" investments.

A 'Safe' Way to Lose Money: Why Not to Buy Bonds Now

About a month ago, the Germany government sold $5 billion worth of Eurobonds that paid an average interest rate of -- get this -- negative 0.0122%. That's right: These bonds are guaranteed to lose value. So why did they sell? In a word, it's all about risk.

10 Smart Places to Invest In Case the U.S. Defaults

The odds that the U.S. will default on its debt increase each day, and even if a short-term deal is reached, the ratings agencies may downgrade U.S. debt anyway. If that happens, turmoil could roil the markets. So where can the smart money flee for safety? 24/7 Wall St. offers 10 safe options.

How the Debt Ceiling Issue Will Hit Us in the Wallet

Even the phrase "debt ceiling" sounds like something too far removed from daily life to be of much interest. But ignoring the political battle over this issue would be a mistake: How the government handles the nation's debt limit will directly affect our personal finances in all sorts of important ways.

One Safe Way to Invest Now in Municipal Bonds

After respected banking analyst Meredith Whitney rattled the municipal bond market with her prediction of hundreds of billions of dollars in muni defaults, small investors dumped the bonds. That dire prediction may yet come true, but there are a few types of munis that still carry virtually no risk.

A Stock Market Breakout Is Likely -- but in Which Direction?

The technical signals suggest we're at a crucial decision point for the stock market: Either a decisive rise or a dramatic fall is coming. And if you're the type to dismiss technical analysis as unscientific voodoo, you're missing the point: It's not about pattern matching, it's about human psychology.

Uncle Sam Wants You. . .to Buy Treasury Bonds

The Treasury has to find buyers for trillions of dollars in new bonds needed to fund the federal deficit. It hopes average citizens will pony up and invest in some $337 billion worth. But for a host of reasons, "safe" T-bonds might not be a winning investment for you.

Why Rising Interest Rates Won't Break the Bull's Run

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note closed at a nine-month high Wednesday, and rising interest rates usually mean bad things for economic growth and stock prices. But until the benchmark hits 5%, explains market guru Jeffrey Kleintop, rising rates mean the good times for stock will continue.

Social Insecurity: Inside the 'Trust Fund' Illusion

The federal government has been borrowing Social Security's surpluses for decades and issuing the program IOUs in return. However, the ability to pay those IOUs depends on the Treasury borrowing more money on global bond market at affordable rates. That's hardly a sure thing.

A Rising Economy Is Pushing Down Treasurys

Doomsayers insist the recent rapid rise in yields signals the nation's creditors finally getting fed up with financing U.S. deficits. But a stronger argument can be made for blaming the better-than-expected economic reports that have been piling up recently.

Forget Stocks. This Year, Bonds Have Had More Fun

It's no secret that stock investors have suffered through roller-coaster volatility this year for no real return, while bond investors have been having a ball. The longest-dated Treasury mutual funds have returned nearly 20%. Stocks, meanwhile, have done zilch.

Hedge Your Risk With Mixed-Asset Mutual Funds

With stocks underperforming so far in 2010, and Treasury bond yields low, too, Standard & Poor's Equity Research suggests investing in mixed-asset mutual funds, which hold a combination of stocks and bonds to capture the strengths of both asset classes with less volatility.