Supercommittee

Fiscal Cliff 'Cliffs Notes': How We Got to the Edge in 5 Easy Steps

Back in July 2011, President Obama and Congress set the country on autopilot toward economic Armageddon to give themselves an incentive to reach a budget deal. It didn't work. As we stare over the fiscal cliff, let's take a quick look back at the path we took to get here.

Fiscal Cliff Pop Quiz: Fun Facts from the Economic Apocalypse

On Jan. 1, 2013, the United States will fall over off the fiscal cliff -- unless Congress and the president ink a deal to avert the crisis. If you think you know all about the forthcoming economic apocalypse -- or if you're just wondering what all the fuss is about -- check out our quiz and see.

5 Financial Turkeys of 2011 (and a Side of Stuffing)

At Thanksgiving, we remember the year's blessings and declare hope for the future. But if you're having a hard time swallowing that this year, we offer this recipe for cooking up 2011's most egregious financial news stories. Bon appetite!

Cramer Blames Monday's Market Slide on Europe

Jim Cramer of CNBC's Mad Money, appeared on Today to discuss Monday's stock market slide with Matt Lauer. Asked what Wall Street had really reacted to, Cramer said it wasn't the supercommittee's failure: "It's all Europe," he told Lauer.

Deep Spending Cuts Pose a New Threat to US Economy

Just as the U.S. economy is making progress despite Europe's turmoil, here come two new threats. A congressional panel is supposed to agree by Thanksgiving on a deficit-reduction package of at least $1.2 trillion. If it fails, federal spending would automatically be cut by that amount starting in 2013.

What's Going On With Next Year's Federal Budget?

It has been a long, confusing summer for the federal budget: The FAA shutdown, the debt ceiling crisis, the Deficit "Supercommittee." But all of that was just prelude to the battles ahead over the 12 major appropriations bills to fund the government's "discretionary" spending.

Meet the 12 People Who Have to Fix the U.S. Budget

There has been a pleasant lull in reporting about the debt ceiling and budget debate, but don't let the quiet fool you. Right now, 11 men and one woman are crafting a plan to reduce the federal budget deficit by $1.5 trillion over 10 years. They are the members of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction -- aka, the Deficit Supercommittee

Medicare's Next Patient: The Federal Budget Deficit

As the federal super committee looks for $1.5 trillion in cuts, it's clear that fixing the federal budget will mean tackling big items -- including Medicare, America's most popular social program and one of its most expensive.