Senior Citizens

Six-Figure Scams Targeting Seniors On the Rise

Older Americans are under more financial pressure than ever. Unfortunately, scam artists are taking advantage of the sometimes desperate needs of seniors to boost their income, and victims have lost huge portions of their life savings as a result.

Why Some Women Are More Confident About Retirement

A new study of 1,000 Americans ages 50 to 70 finds that women face unique risks in retirement, but some are more confident than others about those challenges. What's their secret? DailyFinance's Laura Rowley talks with the study's author, Dr. Sandra Timmerman, director of the MetLife Mature Market Institute.

Long-Term Care for Elderly, Disabled Has Far to Improve

For the first time, there's a state-by-state scorecard of America's performance in providing long-term services and support to senior citizens and people with disabilities, and the results aren't much to brag about. But they do point the way toward improving the long-term care system -- and saving the nation billions.

Don't Let Grandma Get Scammed

In a shaky economy, senior citizens have become a prime target for scammers. Here are some of the common scams -- and warning signs -- to watch out for, along with some tips on how to protect your elderly loved ones.

Medicare's Next Patient: The Federal Budget Deficit

As the federal super committee looks for $1.5 trillion in cuts, it's clear that fixing the federal budget will mean tackling big items -- including Medicare, America's most popular social program and one of its most expensive.

Deciding When to Retire? Consider the Future First

For seniors, delaying retirement can have a big payoff in Social Security benefits. And a new study finds it's easier to decide to wait if you think about the advantages of holding out before you consider the pluses of retiring early.

Your Social Security Benefit: $29.02 a Day

Could you live on less than $30 a day? If you don't have a pension or adequate personal savings, that's what the typical retiree will get in 2036, even setting aside the near-term risks facing Social Security. But don't despair: There are ways to boost your benefits, and ensure that old age doesn't equal penury.

Social Security: Why Seniors Are Just Plain Angry

If Congress fails to raise the debt ceiling soon, come August, the White House warns that tens of millions of Social Security recipients may find their mailboxes empty when they go looking for their checks. Even though some describe it as a "fear tactic," protests by seniors and their advocates are getting much louder.

Don't Let Nana Drive You Into Bankruptcy

For children, excursions with grandmother are an adventure. As time passes, however, the ride into the golden years can get bumpy; if you're financially unprepared, it can take a dramatic turn for the worse, and even drive you and your family into bankruptcy. Here are some steps you can take to prevent that.

Reverse Mortgage Alternatives For Cash-Strapped Seniors

The two biggest banks in the reverse mortgage business are getting out of it. Now, Bank of America and Wells Fargo accounted for less than half of the reverse mortgages in America, and other lenders are still writing them. But for cash-strapped seniors, it might be a good idea to explore alternative ways to stay in their homes.

Elder Abuse: How to Keep Grandma Safe From Con Men

Who would pick the pocket of your grandma or grandpa? Apparently, a lot of people: Older Americans are losing $2.9 billion annually to elder financial abuse, up 12% from 2008, according to "The MetLife Study of Elder Financial Abuse." Here's how to protect your older relatives from becoming victims.

The New 65 Is 70: Retirement Age Shifts Upward

Almost a quarter of Americans and Canadians say they expect to work past the age of 70, and 6% say they'll likely retire after their 80th birthday -- two years longer than the nations' life expectancy, a recent Nielsen survey found. And it's not just a North American trend.

Luxury Retailers Look Past the Baby Boomers

The Great Recession took lot of wealth out of baby boomer pockets, probably for good. That means luxury merchants will have to set their sights on a new demographic for growth in coming years. That group will most likely be the millennials, 25- to 34-year-olds.

The Price of Aging: Will It Break National Budgets?

Thirty out of 49 major developed countries could see their credit ratings plummet to junk status if they don't make changes soon, says a Standard & Poor's study. The biggest problem is health care spending on the elderly, particularly for long-term care.