RetailSalesFigures

US Retail Sales Rose 1.1% in February

Americans stepped up spending on retail goods in February, evidence that a stronger job market is boosting the economy. Consumers bought more autos, clothes and appliances. They also paid higher prices for gas. Retail sales increased 1.1 percent last month, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. It was the biggest gain since September.

Holiday Shopping Season Stronger Than Expected

The holiday shopping season is wrapping up to be bigger than anyone expected. Now, retailers are holding their breath and hoping consumers will keep spending in the final days before Christmas.

Retail Sales Rise for Sixth Straight Month

Americans spent more on autos, furniture and clothing at the start of the crucial holiday shopping season, boosting retail sales for a sixth straight month. Retail sales rose 0.2 percent in November, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

Retailers Report Strong Sales for November

Retailers are reporting strong sales gains in November, boosted by a discount-fueled spending binge for the start of the holiday shopping season last weekend. Now, the challenge is to keep shoppers spending throughout the most important selling period of the year.

The Big Picture This Week: Earnings Season, Inflation

As the market breathes a sigh of relief on hopes that Europe isn't going to fall apart and the unemployment picture isn't getting worse, the focus shifts to China and earnings season. But earnings may be overshadowed if inflation data out of China is worse than expected, now that the country has the world's second largest economy.

July Retail Sales Jump, but August Uncertain

Retail sales were up in July, a rare bright spot among dim economic indicators. But consumers and investors being the way they are, the question on everyone's mind immediately becomes: Can August keep up the pace? We found out what the experts are saying.

U.S. Consumers: Done Spending, or Ready to Restart?

Consumer sentiment is at its lowest level in two years, while the so-called "Misery Index" stands at a three decade-high. And it's true: Americans aren't spending as robustly as they once were. But when you look at the numbers, it becomes clear that U.S. consumers aren't down for the count just yet.