Proxy fight

Barnes & Noble Shareholders Rubber-Stamp Poison Pill

Back in September, billionaire Ron Burkle lost his proxy war with Barnes & Noble's board, failing to kill the poison pill that kept him from upping his stake in the company. That made Wednesday's shareholders meeting all but a formality. But what's next for the nation's largest bookseller?

How a New SEC Rule Could Help Ron Burkle Gain Control of B&N

Barnes & Noble successfully defended itself in a proxy fight with billionaire Ron Burkle, who wants to gain control over the troubled bookseller. But Burkle hasn't given up, and a new SEC "shareholder access" rule could help in his quest.

Is the Barnes & Noble Brawl Over Now? Probably Not

A bitter and extended proxy fight climaxed at Tuesday's shareholder meeting. In the end, B&N Chairman Riggio's defeat of dissident shareholder Burkle was more fait accompli than 11th-hour surprise. And it served far more to raise questions than provide answers.

Barnes & Noble Kicks Off Proxy Fight With Burkle

Barnes & Noble's board has sent a letter to shareholders urging them to vote to rebuff investor Ron Burkle's battle to control the bookseller. The letter is part of annual-meeting materials B&N mailed to shareholders, formally launching its proxy battle.

Barnes & Noble's Founder Digs in for Proxy Fight

Ron Burkle may have drawn first blood in the proxy fight that now looks all but inevitable at Barnes & Noble's annual shareholders meeting next month, but founder and chairman Leonard Riggio is not about to back down. In fact, Riggio's increasing his stock holdings and staying on the board of directors ballot while two others vacate their seats.