Procter and Gamble

P&G Brings Back Lafley as CEO

Consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble brings back its former CEO, A.G. Lafley, a 33-year industry veteran, who left in 2009.

S&P 500 in Longest Winning Streak Since 2004

The Standard & Poor's 500 index closed above 1,500 on Friday for the first time since the start of the Great Recession in 2007, lifted by strong earnings from Procter & Gamble and Starbucks.

Activist Investor William Ackman Targets Procter & Gamble's CEO

William Ackman's Pershing Square Capital Management has taken a $2 billion position in Procter & Gamble, and it's almost certain he wants to oust the CEO. This is hardly Ackman's first attempt to buy big into a company and shake things up -- but it is his biggest.

Unilever CEO Expects to Catch P&G in Five Years

Unilever CEO Paul Polman recently admitted that his company had grown "too little" over the past 10 to 15 years, but said he expects it to catch up with rivals such as Procter & Gamble within the next five years. Find out why Trefis sees the stock as a buy, though it believes that goal may be out of reach.

Walgreen Buys Drugstore.com for Twice Its Value

After years of trying to expand its online presence through organic growth, giant drug store chain Walgreen has decided to buy a bigger Web footprint, acquiring drugstore.com, the country's eighth-largest e-tailer -- and it's paying a premium price.

10 Things You'll Be Paying More for This Year

Expect to pay more this year for many consumer goods -- from diapers to toothpaste to Big Macs. Just as the typical American family will finally have a few more dollars to spend, inflation will take a chunk of that extra cash.

Oprah's OWN Delivers a Strong Debut for Advertisers

Oprah Winfrey's new cable network is commanding some of the highest ad prices on cable, and it justified the rates with its heavily-watched debut. But can OWN continue delivering the viewership to support those premium rates?

Is the 'New Normal' Slow Growth? Not Necessarily

Pessimists say growth simply won't be as vigorous as it was in the past. But a growing roster of high-profile money managers are taking aim at this theme, arguing that it is both wrong-headed and self-defeating.